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Cultural Changes of the 1920's

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Cultural Changes of the 1920's
Cultural Changes of the 1920s

Prohibition:
[pic]
Prescription form for medicinal liquor.

Prohibition had a notable effect on the alcohol brewing industry in the United States. When Prohibition ended, only half the breweries that had previously existed reopened. The post-Prohibition period saw the introduction of the American lager style of beer, which dominates today. Wine historians also note that Prohibition destroyed what was a fledgling wine industry in the United States. Productive wine quality grape vines were replaced by lower quality vines growing thicker skinned grapes that could be more easily transported. Much of the institutional knowledge was also lost as wine makers either emigrated to other wine producing countries or left the business altogether.

Harlem Resinnace:
[pic]
Major Representatives of the Harlem Resonance

The Harlem Renaissance began shortly after World War I as writers, artists and intellectuals from the South, the Caribbean and Africa began to migrate to Harlem.
The Harlem Renaissance resulted in African-American artists gaining the attention of whites and raising awareness by promoting ideas like racial integration and cooperation, which would go on to take effect in the 1960s Civil Rights Movement.

Fundamentalism:
(Can’t find a pic for this, sorry) (
"Temperance", a virture, led to the 18th Amendment outlawing alcohol, which gave rise to the bootleggers and gangsters that made money off of illegal liquor.

New roles for women
[pic]
Women in NC were involved in the Suffrage Parade.

The change in role was also reflected in the media: the garçonne-look portrayed the ideal woman as an androgynous, working woman that had reached equality with men while simultaneously possessing the appeal of the femme fatale.

The Tommy Gun and Band- Aid:
Can’t think of any ideas……
( Sorry………

All pictures and info are from Wikipedia.

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