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Harlem Renaissance: Civil Rights Movement

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Harlem Renaissance: Civil Rights Movement
The Harlem Renaissance was not the head of the Civil Rights Movement, but it was the neck because of the products it produced and the bricks it supplied for the house of equality. DuBois, founder of the renaissance, believed “That an educated Black elite should lead Blacks to liberation.” http://www.eram.k12.ny.us/education/components/whatsnew/default.php?sectiondetailid=23130&&PHPSESSID=e0a64029c09716761056932b46c6816b Art and literature came from the Harlem era. Edward Kennedy "Duke" Ellington was a musician who came from the Harlem Renaissance. Blacks and whites would dance the night away together at the speakeasies were he would perform. Writers like Langston Hughes and Claude McKay inspired the African Americans of the time to …show more content…
James Weldon Johnson, Paul Robeson, or W.E.B. DuBois, the list goes on and on; many activists who would make a detrimental ding in the attempt to keep Black America down. James Weldon Johnson and W.E.B. DuBois were both leaders of the NAACP, which drastically helped in the efforts. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People too had origins to Harlem. Without DuBois the equality could have remained in the hands of Booker T. Washington (he worked for equality, but believed that in time the black people would receive it.). Today we could still have segregated schools. Thurgood Marshall, a NAACP attorney, pursued and won Brown vs. Board of Education, the Supreme Court case that integrated schools. DuBois, creator of The Harlem Renaissance and the NAACP, flipped the first domino. The literature from this period even reached Martin Luther King Jr., to which his I Have a Dream speech derived from. When you take away the bottom bricks of a house, no matter how strong the top ones are, the whole house crumbles into ash and …show more content…
America today may not associate equality with a simple town in New York, but if DuBois was never born or Ellington had decided music wasn’t his passion who could guess where we would be today. As John Wooden would say “It's the little details that are vital. Little things make big things happen.” Remember that it was the mouse that removed the thorn from the lions paw when no one else could. It was then up to the lion to nurse his

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