The Harlem Renaissance: African-American's Cultural Movement

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Harlem Renaissance was African-American’s cultural movement that began in 1920, it was blossoming of African American culture in terms of literature and art starting in the 1920 to 1930 reflecting the growth of Black Nationalism and racial identity. Some universal themes symbolized throughout the Harlem Renaissance were the unique experience of thralldom slavery and egressing African-American folk customs on black individuality. African American population of United States highly contributed in this movement; they played a great role to support it. In fact, major contribution was made by black-owned businesses and publication of their literary works. Nevertheless, it relied on the patronization of whites.
Adelaide was born in Brooklyn, New York on 10/20/01. In 1921, Adelaide Hall debuted in the chorus of the Broadway musical
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Holiday had a thriving career as a Jazz singer for many of years before she lost her battle with substance abuse. In 2000, Billie Holiday was inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. Holiday spent much of her childhood in Baltimore, Maryland. Her mother, Sadie was only a teenager when she had her. Her father is widely believed to Clarence holiday, who eventually became a successful jazz musician, playing with the likes of fletcher Henderson. In her difficult early life, holiday found solace in music, singing along to the records of Bessie smith and Louis Armstrong; holiday began singing in local clubs and renamed her “Billie”. Holiday became involved with Louis McKay. The two were arrested for narcotics in 1956 and they married in Mexico the following year like many other men in her life, McKay used holiday name and money to advance himself despite all of the trouble she had been experiencing with her voice, she manage to give an impressive performance on the CBS television broadcast the sound of jazz with ben Webster, Lester young and Coleman

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