The Influence Of The Harlem Renaissance

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The Harlem Renaissance was a time of art and entertainment. It was a lively time were many artists, writers, musicians, and poets got the opportunity to share their work with a willing audience. It was a time period that gave African Americans a voice, and many talented writers emerged that might have remained silent if it hadn’t been for the Harlem Renaissance. Zora Neal Hurston and James Weldon Johnson were among these writers, publishing powerful novels that allowed African Americans to receive more respect and acknowledgement. The Harlem Renaissance allowed African American writers to share their work with the world in a great artistic movement where they could freely express themselves, as well as bring pride and inspiration to African

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