Chief Seattle Oration Analysis

Good Essays
Seattle Chiefs Ovation The arrival of the European colonists in New England in the 17th century pushed the Native Americans to the west and eventually sparking their demise. Intensive logging impacted their environment, epidemic diseases from Europe claimed lives of thousands of Native Americans, and the Euro-Americans simply took over regions and the land of the native community. The Native Americans were outraged by their inferiority and on the colonist’s treatment of the environment. The Chief Seattle’s 1854 Oration is a speech in response to a proposed treaty in which the Indians were persuaded to give up thousands of acres to the US government for a sum of 150,000 dollars. The Chief Seattle’s Oration is considered to be the most profound environmental statements in history. The Chief Seattle was the leader of the Dkhw’Duw’Absh, and a prominent figure in the Indian-American relationship of the time. At this time, numerous Native American’s were being scattered out of their tribes by the American’s and it was believed that they would be extinct. In the speech, The Chief Seattle attempts to convince the American conquerors that they should treat them fairly despite their inferiority to the American people. Through figurative language and his respect for nature, the Chief appeals to the Governor of their decision to take over Washington making of their time. Prior to the colonisation of North America by the Europeans, the Native Americans lived peacefully and they saw their environmental as communal. Their low-impact technologies saw them live in harmony and respecting the environment. Their religion revolved around the belief that animals, plants, rocks, mountains, rivers, and stars had souls. Upon arrival, the European colonists immediately began take natural resources for European trading and usage. Large forests were cut down for firewood, trading, and agriculture; animals were killed for skin, the girdling of the trees prevented the leaves from growing

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Satisfactory Essays

    Even though the Native American were susceptible to change, the European colonization drastically altered their lives forever. Unfamiliar diseases ravaged their population and whole entire cultures.The desire…

    • 521 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Oration of Chief Seattle

    • 652 Words
    • 2 Pages

    In the oration to Governor Isaac I. Stevens,Chief Seattle tries to persuade the whites of the United States that they should treat the Native Americans equally despite their inferior status.The way Chief Seattle achieves this is through figurative language, organization, and diction, this is how he shows both the reason and pride behind his oration to the Governor. Another function of this orientation is a wake up call to the Governor that the Natives are not as weak as they may seem they do still obtain power.…

    • 652 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Contrary to the story that European Americans have been all too willing to accept, European immigrants came to inhabited territory in North America. Native Americans were numerous and many dwelt in stable communities. They had cleared land on the eastern seaboard and cultivated extensively. Their nations had established territories which were vital to the hunting component of their economics. These facts were evident to European settlers--especially to those who escaped starvation by accepting as gifts the fruits of Native American agriculture.…

    • 902 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Europeans’ had an early dislike and no understanding to the ways of the Native American people. They were two very diverse groups of people that could not simply understand one another. They had different views on customary beliefs, social forms, and material traits of racial, religious, or social groups. Native Americans were people of the land and that was something that Europeans’ did not cling too due to their new technologies. You never judge a book by its cover however and the Europeans’ learned that.…

    • 558 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The “discovery” by Columbus of the New World in 1492 was followed by the establishments of European colonies with French initially in the north and down the Mississippi. The arrival of European settlers in the late 1500s-early 1600s in North America disrupted the Native American tribes that had been living peacefully there for centuries. The responses European settlers had to Native American tribes reflected their own cultural and economic viewpoints. As a result, the Native Americans’ lives changed drastically. The French had developed peaceful, mutually beneficial relations with Native Americans in the establishment of the French fur trade and culturally befriended them. On the other hand, the British tended to oppress Native Americans economically and culturally and denied their potential contributions to helping growing settlements in the New World.…

    • 671 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Hollitz Chapter 1

    • 689 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Although often viewed as inferior, savage and helpless, many historians are starting to discover the intelligence and wisdom the Indians had and shared with the colonists that came to America so long ago. As the settlers slowly began to create a new world on the already inhabited North America, they were plagued with starvation due to a severe drought in the area. Due to the dry lands and the settlers expectations to “rely on Indians for food and tribute,” (Norton 17) they were disappointed to find that the Indians were not so keen to handing out food and help to the strangers that have just come onto their land and begun to settle in such a time of severe weather and starvation. As time goes on, both the Indians and the Englishmen realize they both have what the other needs; tools from the white men and crops, land and knowledge from the Indians. As a result, the chief of Tsenacomoco, Powhatan, and colonist, Captain John Smith on an ideally peaceful, mutualistic relationship to ensure the survival of both civilizations. This agreement will leave the groups in cahoots for 100 of years leading to some disastrous scenarios and betrayals.…

    • 689 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Manifest Destiny

    • 839 Words
    • 4 Pages

    American territorial expansion was rejected by many groups of people for various reasons and Native Americans were no different. Native Americans resisted American territorial expansion in several ways. The following essay will not only consist of reasons for Native American resistance but also provide proof from several primary sources. These sources include Tecumseh’s Appeal to the Osages, where Tecumseh tries to unite dozens of Indian tribes against the United States expansion efforts, Black Hawk’s Encroachment by White Settlers, where Black Hawk, a Sac Indian war chief, conveys his life story to try and justify his actions in the Black Hawk war against the American settlers, and an Encounter between Omaha Hunters and White Squatters in Iowa, where a hostile encounter between Omaha Hunters and White Squatters was the result of dramatically different conceptions of landownership amongst them.…

    • 839 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Native American Religions

    • 1031 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Native Americans have a reverent attitude toward the land, trees, rivers, and mountains. Native Americans who practiced agriculture revere the soil, plants, and tree. Hunting was an important part of life within many Native…

    • 1031 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The European American’s were on a roll of discoveries. From learning there is more to life than the ruling of the king and adopting Enlightenment and democracy to taking the lead in the trading industry with the first landings on the Americas. Their minds then and still today are forward thinking. The English settlement in the Americas was to further their economical growth and commercial industries, not just to have natural land. The Native Americans on the other hand had a strong belief in the natural land as many of their religious beliefs are founded on the magic of mother nature and what it provides. The natural elements of mother nature such as the animals, the sticks, the stars were often brought into religious beliefs and ceremonies.…

    • 682 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Have you ever imagined life as a Native American in the time period of the Columbian Exchange? Did life change drastically for thousands of people? What events went on as more and more new things were exposed into the lives of the Native Americans? Daniel K. Richter turns the gaze of early American history around and forces the reader to consider stories of North America during the period of European settlement rather than just the European colonization of North America in his novel, Facing East from Indian Country: A Native History of Early America. Richter, being an American Historian focuses both his research and teaching on colonial North America and on Native American history dating back before 1800. Through Richter’s writing he reintegrated Indians into the history of North America by expressing their side of the event and/or time in history as well as the side of the first-hand settlers in America. Richter states in the novel, “Perhaps the strangest lesson of all was that in the new nation Whites were the ones entitled to be called “Americans.” Indians bizarrely became something else” (p.2). Through the detailed writing in the novel it is not possible to dismiss the formative role of the Native Americans in the history of colonial and early America.…

    • 805 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Ap English Prompt #1

    • 701 Words
    • 3 Pages

    In Chief Seattle’s oration to Governor Isaac I. Stevens, Seattle attempts to fight for equality for Native Americans despite their differences in social status with the Caucasians. Through the use of rhetorical strategies such as figurative language, organization, diction and tone, Seattle attacks the Governor’s malicious deeds, while at the same time praises him, and reminds him that the Native people, although presented as weak beings, are not entirely powerless.…

    • 701 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Throughout the 19th century Native Americans were treated far less then respectful by the United States’ government. This was the time when the United States wanted to expand and grow rapidly as a land, and to achieve this goal, the Native Americans were “pushed” westward. It was a memorable and tricky time in the Natives’ history. The US government made many treatments with the Native Americans, making big changes on the Indian nation. Native Americans wanted to live peacefully with the white men, but the result of treatments and agreements was not quite peaceful. In this essay I will explain why and how the Native Americans were treated by the United States’ government, in which way were the treaties broken and how the Native nation were affected by the 19th century happenings. I will focus mostly on the Cherokee Indians.…

    • 1506 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Native Americans have long had an immediate relationship with their physical environment. They defined themselves by their land and by the sacred places that bounded and shaped their world. Most lived in lived in relatively small units close to the earth, living off of its rhythms and resources. They recognize a unity in their physical and spiritual universe. Land (its loss, location, and resource wealth or poverty), exploitation of land, and changing Indian needs, attitudes and religious demands define the issues the Indians and their environment faced.…

    • 1694 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    3. The Europeans believed that the Earth belonged to the humans. The Native Americans believed the opposite, the Earth was sacred to them.They had very spiritual beliefs towards the Earth.…

    • 544 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Tecumseh Research Paper

    • 446 Words
    • 2 Pages

    With the Confederation almost complete, forwarded Shawnee decision to send Tecumseh, a young renowned warrior and a strong speaker ‘to traverse the Miscopy Valley, seeking to revive Neolin’s pan Indian alliance of the 1760s. Feeling that the only alternative to westward expansion was extermination, as one chief asked “Where are the Narragansett, the Mohican, the Pocanet, and other powerful tribes of our people? ‘They have vanished before the avarice {greed) and oppression of the white man, as snow before the sun.’ Indians, he proclaimed, must recognize that they were a single people and equal right in the land. He repudiated, “chiefs who had sold land to the federal government were no better than their white rivals.”…

    • 446 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays