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Hollitz Chapter 1

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Hollitz Chapter 1
Butler, Jordan
Hist1301
Martinez
12 June 2013
Hollitz 1 Essay Although often viewed as inferior, savage and helpless, many historians are starting to discover the intelligence and wisdom the Indians had and shared with the colonists that came to America so long ago. As the settlers slowly began to create a new world on the already inhabited North America, they were plagued with starvation due to a severe drought in the area. Due to the dry lands and the settlers expectations to “rely on Indians for food and tribute,” (Norton 17) they were disappointed to find that the Indians were not so keen to handing out food and help to the strangers that have just come onto their land and begun to settle in such a time of severe weather and starvation. As time goes on, both the Indians and the Englishmen realize they both have what the other needs; tools from the white men and crops, land and knowledge from the Indians. As a result, the chief of Tsenacomoco, Powhatan, and colonist, Captain John Smith on an ideally peaceful, mutualistic relationship to ensure the survival of both civilizations. This agreement will leave the groups in cahoots for 100 of years leading to some disastrous scenarios and betrayals. The Indians definitely aid the settlers in many ways. First, by not aiding them right off the bat in the starvation period, gives the settlers a bit of a backbone and a realistic outlook on this venture. A view such that this place is not like Spain, they have to start from nothing and actually work to survive or they will die, surely. With this outlook on the entire journey, the Indians supply a sense of relief when they reach out to the settlers to form some sort of agreement to aid each population. The Indians gave the Englishmen food to keep them from being wiped out from famine and “hoped to acquire guns, hatchets, and swords,” (Norton 17) however this relationship did not workout properly and the Indians did not receive their weapons. Towards the 1620s, the

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