AP World History Chapter 1 Guided Reading

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A.P. World History
Guided Reading 1
"The Origins of Agriculture to the First River-Valley Civilizations”

TERMS:

Culture - Socially transmitted patterns of action and expression

Foragers - Hunting and food gathering people Animal domestication - The killing of animals for food

Pastorialism - Way of life dependent on large herds of grazing livestock

Matrilineal - Kinship with mother 

Patrilineal - Kinship with father

Lineages - the holding of land by large kinship (blood relationship) units

Megaliths - very large stones constructed for ceremonial and religious purposes in Neolithic times

Civilizations - Any group of people sharing a set of cultural traits

Babylonian Creation Myth - climaxes in a vast battle between Marduk, the chief god of Babylon, and Tiamat

City-State - A small independent state consisting of an urban center and the surrounding agricultural territory

Lugal - “big man” (king)

Cuneiform - System of writing in wedge shaped symbols that represented words Dynasty - the chief god of that town gained prominence throughout the land

Hammurabi’s Law Code - reflects social divisions that may have been valid for other places and times despite inevitable fluctuations

Scribes - an administrator or scholar charged by the temple or palace with reading and writing tasks

Anthropomorphic gods - Gods with human characteristics

Ziggurat - A massive pyramidal stepped tower made of mud bricks

Amulets - Small charm meant to protect the bearer from evil

Technology - tools and processes by which humans manipulate the physical world

Cataract - Large waterfall

Pharaoh - The central figure in the ancient Egyptian State

Ma’at - Egyptian term for the concept of divinely created and maintained order in the universe

Pyramid - A large, triangular stone monument, used in Egypt and Nubia as a burial place for the king 

The Great Pyramid - The age of the great pyramids lasted about a

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