Addiction to Nicotine

Good Essays
Addiction to Nicotine
Robin S. Combs
Com/156
August 18, 2013
Kathryn Voigt

Addiction to Nicotine
There are many types of addiction, gambling, eating, drinking, smoking, drugs, or any other behavior that is habit forming. One of the strongest addictions know today is to nicotine. After researching the effect of nicotine addiction on humans this information came to light, “The relapse rate for smokers who try to quit the habit is discouragingly high: about 90 percent ultimately begin smoking again at some point down the line. Most of those smokers relapse in the first three months after the decision to quit….” (Sailor, 2013). All of the information in this document will tie to the chemical reaction in the brain causing addiction. Continued use, dependency, quitting use, withdrawal, and relapse are all parts of addiction. The continued use of tobacco creates a chemical reaction in the human brain, causing addiction to nicotine.
There is more than one way nicotine can be delivered into the human system. One of the main ways that nicotine is delivered is through smoking tobacco. Within seconds of the first puff from a cigarette, or tobacco pipe, nicotine is one a direct path to the human brain. This almost instant chemical transfer plays a huge role in the addiction process. Nicotine is habit forming, causing the first step in addiction, Continued use.
Another vice that is commonly used to feed nicotine addiction is chewing tobacco. Although there is a large difference in chewing tobacco and smoking tobacco, they perform the same process. Chewing tobacco’s nicotine content enters the human system through the mouth tissues that it comes in contact with. This type of tobacco contains materials that cause abrasions on the skin and gums in the mouth creating a direct connection between the chemicals and blood stream. Chewing tobacco, per use, normally lasts longer than the amount of time a person spends smoking a cigarette. This means there is a prolonged exposure



References: Martin, T. (2012, DEC 23). Nicotine Addiction 101. Retrieved from http://quitsmoking.about.com/od/nicotine/a/nicotineeffects.htm Solof, B. (2013). Michaels house: A surprising look at the world’s most addictive drugs. Retrieved from http://www.michaelshouse.com/drug-addiction/most-addictive-drugs-world/ Sailor, M. (2013, Summer). Discovery fit & health; how often to smokers relapse when they quit? Retrieved from http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/smoking-cessation/how-often-do-smokers-relapse.htm

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