• A STAKEHOLDER FRAMEWORK FOR ANALYZING AND EVALUATING CORPORATE SOCIAL PERFORMANCE
    of the methodologies for data collection, analysis, and evaluation: (a) 1983-1985: 30 field studies; (b) 1986-1988: 28 studies; and (c) 1989-1993: 20 studies. A RESEARCH PROGRAM TO ANALYZE AND EVALUATE CSP Stage 1: 1983-1985 When this research and teaching program on CSR1 was initiated in 1983, there...
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  • Csr, Evolution of Defitional Construct
    excellent example of the growing interest in operationalizing CSR and seeing if it had any relation to financial performance was the research of Philip Cochran and Robert Wood (1984). As a backdrop to their empirical study, it must be observed that scholars were becoming interested in the question of whether...
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  • icycong
    of firms. Corporate social performance thus is adopted to direct the business how to be responsible for society and reduce social risks. Wartick and Cochran (1985) proposed that three steps to deal with social demands: issue identification, issue analysis and form response. From middle 1990s, the...
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  • Mcc Ddda
    Programs as Control Systems: Influences of Executive Commitment and Environmental Factors Author(s): Gary R. Weaver, Linda Klebe Treviño, Philip L. Cochran Source: The Academy of Management Journal, Vol. 42, No. 1 (Feb., 1999), pp. 41-57 Published by: Academy of Management Stable URL: http://www.jstor...
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  • social responsibility
    Decision framework Long term Medium and short term Source: Adapted from S.L. Wartick and P.L. Cochran, “The Evolution of the Corporate Social Performance Model,” Academy of Management Review, October 1985, p. 766. 5–7 Does Social Responsibility Pay?  Studies appear to show a positive...
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  • Csr Theories
    of business in society have been understood. Other classifications have been suggested based on matters related to CSR, such as Issues Management (Wartick and Rude, 1986; Wood, 1991a) or the concept of Corporate Citizenship (Altman, 1998). An alternative approach is presented by Brummer (1991) who proposes...
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  • The Importance of Stakeholders According to Business Leaders.
    range of organizational stakeholder orientations which differentiate self-interested behavior from other-interested behavior (see Figure 1). Wartick and Cochran,(FN28) for example, argue that social responsibility--the extent to which organizational outcomes are consistent with societal expectations--is...
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  • Csr Effect
    community. Business activity does cause definite consequences in the social life of the community becoming a vital issue for any social group (Wartick& Cochran, 1985). As a result CSR may be analyzed as a set of actions made to meet the needs of the organization’s community. It is basically the corporation’s...
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  • Ethical Identity
    Margolis and Walsh, 2003). Stakeholder theory deepens its roots in the notion of corporate social responsibility (Carroll, 1979; Clarkson, 1995; Wartick and Cochran, 1985; Wood, 1991) and in the seminal book of Freeman, (1984), Strategic Management: A Stakeholder Approach. The main thesis of the theory is that...
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  • Csr; Study on Starbucks
    expresses the four levels of responsibility, which consisted economic, legal, ethical and philanthropic. Carroll’s model was improved by Wartick and Cochran (1985) and came the four different ‘process of corporate responsiveness’ (Elisabet and Domenec, 2008), they outline the different approaches which...
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  • Miss
    because responsibility suggested motivation and that is not measurable (Wood, 2010, p.52). The model of CSP continued to be discussed and in 1985 Watrick and Cochran updated and extended Carroll’s model to make it more robust and logical. They incorporated the three aspects of Carroll (1979) – corporate...
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility
    they operate and which franchises them to operate. In a sense, a social contract exists and confirms corporations to society’s objectives Wartick & Cochran (1985).[26] Within the corporate social performance (CSP) framework, Carroll (1979) stated that corporate social responsiveness is measured by the...
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  • Csr in Journal
    However, CSR1's broad emphasis on obligations (Mitnick, 1995) and notions of a social contract between business and society (Gray et al., 1988; Wartick and Cochran, 1985) was often deemed overly vague and ambiguous (Clarkson, 1995; Jones, 1996; McGee, 1998), with Votaw (1972, p. 11) claiming it came to mean...
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  • corporate responsibility
    responsibilities and philanthropic responsibilities. Carroll‟s model has been adopted by several researchers and business executives like Wartick and Cochran, (1985) and Wood, (1991). Carroll (1991) afterwards depicted these components in the form of a pyramid. Some attributes of CSR are also available...
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  • Asif Notes
    from the Holy Qur’an and the Hadith of the Prophet (pbuh) to substantiate our claim. 7 See for example Aurpele, Carroll, et al. (1985), Wartick and Cochran (1985), Wood (1991), Pikston and Carroll (1994), Lewin, Sakano, et al. (1995), Swanson (1995), Maignan (2001), Ruf, Muralidhar, et al. (2001)...
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility
    is that the interests of a firm’s equity holders sometimes need to be set aside in favor of the interests of the firm’s other stakeholders (Banfield, 1985; Carroll, 1995; Windsor, 2001). That is, according to social responsibility theorists, firms should sometimes engage in activities that benefit employees...
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  • Corporate Responsibility
    conditions, (b) attending to stakeholder demands, and (c) designing plans and policies aimed at enhancing the firm's positive impacts. Similarly, Wartick and Cochran (1985), along with Wood (1991), suggested that issues management and environmental assessment constitute two sets of managerial processes useful...
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  • Managing Sustainability with the Support of Bi
    Eells (1960), Blau and Scott (1962), Emery and Trist (1965), Walton (1967) and Zenisek (1979) Abbot and Monsen (1979) and Clarkson (1985) Carrol (1979), Wartick and Cochran (1985), Wood (1991) and Elkington (1998) social. To better manage the complexity of articulating these dimensions, three types of...
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  • Corporate Social Responsibilities Practises in the Banking Sector in Bangladesh
    costs, increasing competitive advantage, improved community image, enhanced reputation, and increased profitability and stock performance. Wartick and Cochran (1985) depicted the evolution of the corporate social performance model by focusing on three challenges to the concept of corporate social responsibility:...
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  • Values
    (Gupta, 2007)  The term corporate social performance was first coined by Sethi (1975), expanded by Carroll (1979), and then refined by Wartick and Cochran (1985). In Sethi's 1975 three-level model, the concept of corporate social performance was discussed, and distinctions made between various corporate...
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