• Csr, Evolution of Defitional Construct
    which CSR might be classified or subsumed. We saw earlier references to CSP in the 1970s (e.g., Carroll, 1977, 1979; Preston, 1978; Sethi, 1975), but the idea of a CSP “model” continued to draw interest. Therefore, Steven Wartick and Philip Cochran (1985) presented their “evolution of the corporate...
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  • A STAKEHOLDER FRAMEWORK FOR ANALYZING AND EVALUATING CORPORATE SOCIAL PERFORMANCE
    the field to collect, organize, and evaluate corporate data. Wartick and Cochran (1985), building on Carroll's integrative view of CSP, also rejected earlier views that social responsibility, social responsiveness, and the management of social issues were separate, alternative corporate concerns...
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  • icycong
    , etc. this cause risks to the operations of firms. Corporate social performance thus is adopted to direct the business how to be responsible for society and reduce social risks. Wartick and Cochran (1985) proposed that three steps to deal with social demands: issue identification, issue analysis and...
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  • The Importance of Stakeholders According to Business Leaders.
    giving. It could be argued that this fits with a broad understanding of the community. Many authors, however, describe a range of organizational stakeholder orientations which differentiate self-interested behavior from other-interested behavior (see Figure 1). Wartick and Cochran,(FN28) for...
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  • Mcc Ddda
    Corporate Ethics Programs as Control Systems: Influences of Executive Commitment and Environmental Factors Author(s): Gary R. Weaver, Linda Klebe Treviño, Philip L. Cochran Source: The Academy of Management Journal, Vol. 42, No. 1 (Feb., 1999), pp. 41-57 Published by: Academy of Management Stable...
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  • Csr Theories
    the firm Searches for social legitimacy and processes to give appropriate responses to social issues Mitchell et al. (1997), Agle and Mitchell (1999), Rowley (1997) Carroll (1979), Wartick and Cochran (1985), Wood (1991b) Swanson (1995) 64 Freeman (1984, 1994), Evan and Freeman (1988...
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  • Csr Effect
    social life of the community becoming a vital issue for any social group (Wartick& Cochran, 1985). As a result CSR may be analyzed as a set of actions made to meet the needs of the organization’s community. It is basically the corporation’s “amenability” to take into account the needs the...
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  • Ethical Identity
    , 2003). Stakeholder theory deepens its roots in the notion of corporate social responsibility (Carroll, 1979; Clarkson, 1995; Wartick and Cochran, 1985; Wood, 1991) and in the seminal book of Freeman, (1984), Strategic Management: A Stakeholder Approach. The main thesis of the theory is that the...
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  • Miss
    concepts came from Wood, who revisited the models of Carroll’s (1979) and Wartick and Cochran (1985). Wood saw that the model “did not taking into account the complexity of the roles that managers have in society and the effects of their actions had on others” (Wood, 2010, p.53). Were Carroll 1979 made...
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  • Asif Notes
    consistent with the spirit and the teachings of Islam. Table 1 provides some selected sources from the Holy Qur’an and the Hadith of the Prophet (pbuh) to substantiate our claim. 7 See for example Aurpele, Carroll, et al. (1985), Wartick and Cochran (1985), Wood (1991), Pikston and Carroll (1994...
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  • Csr; Study on Starbucks
    pyramid of corporate social responsibility (Carroll, 1979) http://smcbball42.wordpress.com/archie-carrol/ The ‘pyramid’ of CSR expresses the four levels of responsibility, which consisted economic, legal, ethical and philanthropic. Carroll’s model was improved by Wartick and Cochran (1985) and...
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility
    , expectations, and principles of the wider society within which they operate and which franchises them to operate. In a sense, a social contract exists and confirms corporations to society’s objectives Wartick & Cochran (1985).[26] Within the corporate social performance (CSP) framework, Carroll (1979...
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  • Csr in Journal
    on obligations (Mitnick, 1995) and notions of a social contract between business and society (Gray et al., 1988; Wartick and Cochran, 1985) was often deemed overly vague and ambiguous (Clarkson, 1995; Jones, 1996; McGee, 1998), with Votaw (1972, p. 11) claiming it came to mean ``something, but not...
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  • corporate responsibility
    responsibilities and philanthropic responsibilities. Carroll‟s model has been adopted by several researchers and business executives like Wartick and Cochran, (1985) and Wood, (1991). Carroll (1991) afterwards depicted these components in the form of a pyramid. Some attributes of CSR are also...
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  • The Business Case for Corporate Social Responsibility: a Review of Concepts, Research and Practice
    socially responsible initiatives (Carroll 1979; Wartick and Cochran 1985; Wood 1991). This focus on outcomes was moving the field closer to the idea of the ‘business case’. At least when outcomes are emphasized, this sets the stage for attempts to measure or gauge the results of CSR policies and...
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  • Corporate Responsibility
    ) outlined three main activities representative of corporate social responsiveness: (a) monitoring and assessing environmental conditions, (b) attending to stakeholder demands, and (c) designing plans and policies aimed at enhancing the firm's positive impacts. Similarly, Wartick and Cochran (1985...
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility
    , 1995; Davis, 1973; Moskowitz, 1975; Wartick & Cochran, 1985; Wood, 1991a). However, as long as a firm’s actions are consistent with this general definition of social responsibility—that is, as long as they are voluntary and designed to improve social or environmental conditions—they are considered...
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  • Examining the Article: Managers’ Business School Education and Military Service: Possible Links to Corporate Criminal Activity
    , Criminology, and Police Science, 44:151-165. Wall Street Journal. Fall out: Military officers resign to join ranks of business world. 9 April 1985, p. A33. Cochran, P. and D. Nigh (1987), Illegal Corporate Behavior and the Question of Moral Agency, in W. Frederick (Ed.), Research in Corporate Social...
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  • Organization Behavior
    and fulfill their legal obligations. However, they also should adhere to ethical standards not mandated by law and engage in some philanthropic or other discretionary activities that help address the needs of society (e.g., Carroll, 1979; Wartick & Cochran, 1985; Wood, 1991). According to this...
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  • Values
    performance was first coined by Sethi (1975), expanded by Carroll (1979), and then refined by Wartick and Cochran (1985). In Sethi's 1975 three-level model, the concept of corporate social performance was discussed, and distinctions made between various corporate behaviors. Sethi's three tiers were...
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