"Summary Of South Of The Slot By Jack London" Essays and Research Papers

  • Summary Of South Of The Slot By Jack London

    South of the slot, by Jack London The slot is a metaphor of the "class cleavage of society". There was a contrast between the North and South of the Slot in terms of building types: in the North were the higher-class centers of diversion, lodging, and business; and in the South were the lower-class centers of lodging, unskilled work/business. The buildings are figures of two contrasting classes that were segregated (?). In order to study the southern people (the working class) a sociology professor...

    Bourgeoisie, Laborer, Marxism 593  Words | 2  Pages

  • Jack London

    Jack London Some say he was “the successor to Poe” (Unger). Was he truly the successor to Edgar Allen Poe? Jack London believed in a fine line between Social Darwinism and social justice, and individualism and socialism. He reflected his beliefs into all of his novels and stories. American writer, Jack London, made a successful career out of his experiences and adventures. JackLondon was born in San Francisco, the illegitimate child of Flora Wellman” on January 12, 1876 (Jack London St). It...

    Glen Ellen, California, Jack London, Jack London State Historic Park 1690  Words | 5  Pages

  • Jack London

    Jack London This writer is often called by an embodiment of an American dream. He created himself, counting only on the forces and the persistent work. Within 18 years he didn't put down a notebook where wrote down all the thoughts and supervision which could be useful to him in work and that wouldn't occur, daily created 5 pages of texts. Him called Jack London. He was born on 12th of January in 1876 in San Francisco where his parents - Flora Wellman, the daughter of the ruined wheaten magnate...

    Jack London, Kittredge Haskins, Marriage 922  Words | 3  Pages

  • Jack London

    Jack London, an American author known for his thrilling adventure stories, showed the world that even an exciting story that takes place in exotic settings can include all the intricacies of great literature. This is seen in many of his stories with the implementation of symbolism, many times a recurring theme in his work. Also, London used many ideas of the day such as Darwinism and Spencerism in his writings in order to better portray his views. However, perhaps one of the most telling signs that...

    Carl Jung, Jack London, Klondike Gold Rush 1217  Words | 3  Pages

  • Jack London

    Jack London's short story The Law of Life follows Koskoosh, an elder member of an indigenous tribe in the Klondike, through his final living hours. Because of the harsh environment, scarcity of food, and the importance of the group's survival, the tribe abandons the blind, old man in the tundra with only a fire burning nearby and a few pieces of wood to sustain it. While the man waits for death, the reader learns, through Koskoosh's memory, of his life, his tribe's traditions, and the laws of nature...

    A Story, Death, Gerontology 1501  Words | 4  Pages

  • Christopher Jack London McCandless

                              Christopher “Jack London” McCandless                                            Anna Wilson  English III Honors  Petrulla  26 November 2014  Wilson 2    Two people in two generations so different, yet so alike. Jack London, an American  author, wrote books like ​ Call of The Wild​  and ​ White Fang​ . Both were about adventure and  discovering something and that is exactly what Christopher McCandless did. Christopher  McCandless was an adventurer and a seeker of himself...

    Alaska, Christopher McCandless, Emile Hirsch 1506  Words | 7  Pages

  • Jack London: Biography

    Jack London : Biography      "You can't wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club" (BrainyQuote). This is one of Jack London's more well known quotes. Jack London was born as John Griffith Chaney on January 12, 1876, in San Francisco("Jack London"). His mother was Flora Wellman and his father was suspected to be astrologer William H. Chaney, who denied his paternity and abandoned London's mother(Wilson). London was suckled, or nursed, by an ex-slave named Virginia Prentiss, who...

    Charmian London, Family, Jack London 1301  Words | 4  Pages

  • Family and Jack London

    Hargrove Coach Platt English III 14 April 2011 The Famous Life of Jack London Jack London is one of the greatest natural writers. When jack was a child, he lived a very awkward and hectic life. As jack got older he got married twice and had three kids. He also wrote a lot about nature and wildlife in his books. However, by jacks forties he died. Jack London will always be known for his natural writing. Jack London was born in San Francisco, California in 1876 (Hart). He was the son of...

    An Unmarried Woman, Family, Flora 1280  Words | 4  Pages

  • Jack London and Nature

    Francisco in 1876, he was abandoned shortly after birth by his father. Therefore, London took the name of his stepfather, John London. Forced to leave school at the age of fourteen and find work because of his family's poor financial situation, he joined the Klondike gold rush of 1898, returning to San Francisco broke, but with an abundance of memories and ideas. During his travels to the Klondike regions, Jack London pondered the importance of humanity. He realized, as important as humans thing they...

    Human, Humans, Jack London 2292  Words | 6  Pages

  • Jack London Research Paper

    Whitlock Ms. Baswell English III 4 November 2014 Author: Jack London Jack London was one of America’s most celebrated writers. London (1876-1916) gained worldwide acclaim as a writer by basing his works on his own colorful worldwide exploits. “Jack London was a native Californian who achieved worldwide acclaim as a powerful storyteller, a legendary public figure, and America's most commercially successful writer” (Hogge 12). London had a remarkable talent for writing about many of issues that...

    Dog, Fiction, Jack London 2643  Words | 10  Pages

  • Jack London: to Build a Fire

    Introduction Jack London had already established himself as a popular writer when his story "To Build a Fire" appeared in the Century Magazine in 1908. This tale of an unnamed man's disastrous trek across the Yukon Territory near Alaska was well received at the time by readers and literary critics alike. While other works by London have since been faulted as overly sensational or hastily written, "To Build a Fire" is still regarded by many as an American classic. London based the story on his...

    Alaska, Canada, Cryobiology 917  Words | 3  Pages

  • Jack London: The Law of LIfe

    Jack London: The Law of Life Culture is the expression of our nature on how we live, interact, believe, where we gain our knowledge, and it also distinguishes people from another in divergent societies. The culture of Native Americans is so history rich and storied cultured that it cannot be easily misinterpreted by anyone that is foreign of their way of life. In “The Law of Life,” Jack London describes the culture of the Native Americans and their proclivity towards life as it revolves around...

    Afterlife, Death, Life 1895  Words | 5  Pages

  • South on the Slot

    In the short story South of the Slot by Jack London, an iron crack runs down the center of Market Street. It is the twin slot that guides the horsecars on their way, similar to the famous cable car tracks in San Francisco. It also separates the northern commercial areas and good neighborhoods from the southern industrial areas, working class neighborhoods, and slums. As a symbol, the slot represents the class cleavage of San Francisco, the unbridgeable separation between respectable citizens and...

    Marxism, Novella, Short story 554  Words | 2  Pages

  • The World: as Jack London Sees It

    The World: As London Sees It The world as a conscious being stupefies some, as it is an awesome thought that many people ponder. The thought of the universe as a thing that picks and chooses who lives and dies terrifies some, while some welcome the idea and coexist with it. Jack London, the author of such books as The Call of the Wild, and The Sea Wolf, is one such man who lives with the idea. London views the world as a Darwinist, or with the theory of natural selection. He sees the world with...

    Biology, Gene, Jack London 2646  Words | 6  Pages

  • Jack London WHITE FANG

    Jack London's full name was John Griffith London, and he was born in San Francisco. After completing grammar school, London worked at various jobs to help support his family. His life as a writer essentially began in 1893. That year he had weathered a harrowing voyage, one in which a typhoon had nearly taken out London and his crew. The 17-year-old adventurer returned home and regaled his mother with his tales of what had happened to him. When she saw an announcement in one of the local papers...

    Canidae, Canis, Coyote 1689  Words | 3  Pages

  • Jack London and His Call of the Wild

    of the parts of his nature that were deeper than he, going back into the womb of Time." - Jack London, The Call of the Wild, Ch. 3 (Jack London Quotes). This quote summarizes the success of Jack London’s writing career in one simple sentence. London’s success and inspiration for his naturalist style can be accredited to the way in which he was raised, and his experiences during his lifetime. Jack London, was born John Griffith Chaney on January 12, 1876 near San Francisco, California. His mother...

    Jack London, Klondike Gold Rush, Martin Eden 1150  Words | 3  Pages

  • A Comparison on the Life of Buck and Jack London

    A COMPARISON ON THE LIFE OF BUCK AND JACK LONDON A Requirement Submitted to the Faculty of Baguio City National High School In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements in English III by Masedman, Moises Migallon, Diane Kaye January 2010 Table of Contents Title page p.i Table of contents p.ii I. Introduction p.1 II. Chapter 1 p.3 III. Chapter 2 p.6 IV. Chapter 3 p.8 V. Conclusion ...

    A Story, Dog, English-language films 1980  Words | 7  Pages

  • Jack London, Darwinism in Jack London, A Zoom On "Law of Life"

    Jack London,the famous american writer insisted on writing political essays in his times. He was among the most influential figures of his days,who understood how to create a public person and use the media to market his self created image of poor -boy -turned -success. One of his most remarkable works named "the call of the wild" (1903), is now accepted as a classic of world literature ,one of the most widely translated and published books by an american writer. The stduy of Jack London's work...

    Charles Darwin, Creationism, Darwinism 1085  Words | 4  Pages

  • Jack London- "To Build a Fire"

    In many of Jack London’s stories, he displays the constant struggle between man and nature. In the short fiction, “To Build a Fire,” London demonstrates the human race’s inability to listen to nature when needed. The opening of “To Build a Fire” uses vivid imagery, giving you a strong idea of the cold and harsh weather. “There was no sun nor hint of sun, though there was not a cloud in the sky.” this sentence alone could set chills to the reader. (London 127-137) The imagery is meant to bring...

    Audience, Character, Dog 1124  Words | 3  Pages

  • To Build a Fire by Jack London

     Naturalism Essay    When Jack London wrote "To Build a Fire" he embraced the idea of naturalism because it  mirrored the events of daily life​ .​  Naturalism displayed how humans had to be cautious at every  corner because at anytime death could be there, waiting for them to make a mistake and forfeit  their lives​ .​  He used naturalism, the most realistic literary movement, to show how violent and  uncaring nature really is and how no matter what you do nature will always be there. London  also presente...

    English-language films, Gray Wolf, Jack London 1002  Words | 4  Pages

  • Contributions of Jack London to American Literature

    Jack London is an author known for his stories of the North. My author's contribution to American literature is gargantuan. Jack London has produced many well-known American novels. He has had a difference on the approach writers take on crafting their literature. His most well known novel "To Build A Fire" is one of the greatest American short stories ever created. In a good number of his stories the central conflict is man vs. nature. His impact on American literature has altered the way people...

    Fiction, Jack London, Klondike Gold Rush 931  Words | 3  Pages

  • Naturalism in Jack Londons "To Build a Fire"

    influence. This struggle against nature is depicted by many authors of the 19th and early 20th centuries, using key concepts of naturalism and determinism, a key component of naturalist theory, as a foundation and philosophy for many of these stories. Jack London and Stephen Crane are notorious for their writings which have been regarded as cornerstones of naturalist theory in classic American literature. Stories such as "to Build a Fire", "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky”, convey themes of naturalism and...

    Charles Darwin, Determinism, Evolution 2028  Words | 5  Pages

  • Literary Analysis of Stories by Jack London

    Literary Analysis of stories by Jack London For my author project on Jack London I read three of his books. I read The Sea Wolf, which is about the hardships of being out at sea. The Call of the Wild, Which is about a dog that is sent into the wild. White Fang, which is the opposite the call of the wild where a “wolf” becomes tame. They are all interesting books all by one well-known author. For the first book I read I chose The Sea Wolf. The book is about a guy named Humphrey "Hump" Van Weyden...

    Dog, Gray Wolf, Jack London 1018  Words | 3  Pages

  • The Effects of Regionalism on the Works of Jack London

    The Affects of Regionalism on the Works of Jack London In 1903, Jack London published his novel Call of the Wild, and with it made his mark on literature in America and achieved worldwide acclaim. It’s a story of a dog named Buck, who was snatched from his luxurious home in Santa Clara, California, and transported to the Yukon Territory to work as a labor dog during the Klondike gold rush in 1897. Buck assimilates to survive among abusive men and vicious dogs, and in the process he discovers...

    Bennett Lake, Gold, Jack London 1726  Words | 5  Pages

  • A Comparison of Jack London and Stephen Crane.

    A Comparison of Jack London and Stephen Crane. Jack London and Stephen Crane were both well-known literary naturalists who died at relatively early ages. Despite having lived such a short life, Jack London lived a full life. He has achieved wide popularity abroad, with his work being translated into more than fifty languages, as well as having written fifty literary works in eighteen years. His stories in the naturalistic mode still continue to influence writers today. Stephen Crane was also an...

    Fiction, Naturalism, Nature 1493  Words | 4  Pages

  • "To Build a Fire" by Jack London Review

    Rachel Foxworth An Extremely Icy Examination What would you do if you had to trek across the frozen tundra of Alaska, in weather that was seventy-five degrees below zero? In “To Build a Fire,” by Jack London, a fictional short story, a man has to go through just that, with only a dog, some matches and a can of biscuits to help him through. As the man continues his journey, going off the designated trail, various parts of his body begin to freeze in his desperate attempt to reach...

    Antagonist, Character, Chewing tobacco 891  Words | 3  Pages

  • Jack London Law of Life

    reassurance. He thought of the fact that his granddaughter was still being called by life, and living very much in the present, while he was dying. “ he stretched forth a palsied hand which wandered tremblingly over the small heap of dry wood beside him.” (London). 2. Provide direct evidence showing a ceremonial similarity between the past burial of the missionary and the future burial of Little Koo – tee. “they would burn a hole through the frozen tundra and pile rocks above to keep the wolverines away...

    Death, Life, Meaning of life 900  Words | 2  Pages

  • Jack London: Famous American Writer of Animals and Nature

    Jack London Jack London is one of the most famous American writers. He wrote many great books over his short lifetime. Many of his stories are about animals and nature, which most people can relate to. Because of his great stories, he was able to be a financial success. London's books are read in most grade schools in America. To say that he was a great writer would be an understatement. Jack London, one of America's most famous writers, wrote the novel The Call of the Wild which contains many...

    Cengage Learning, Glen Ellen, California, Jack London 2680  Words | 7  Pages

  • Epiphany: Short Story and Jack London

    An Analysis of the Man’s Epiphany in “To Build a Fire” The short story “To Build a Fire,” written by Jack London, is a tragic tale of an overconfident, inexperienced man traveling through the brutal, sub-freezing conditions of the Yukon with only the companionship of a dog. The man, un-named in this story, arrogantly decides to break from the main trail to take a less traveled route against the advice of the seasoned old-timer of Sulfur Creek, who warns of traveling alone in such severe conditions...

    Cryobiology, Death, Dog 968  Words | 3  Pages

  • South Sea House Summary

    THE SOUTH SEA HOUSE The south-Sea House stands on the north side of Threadneedle Street, not far away from the Bank of England, and is a melancholy, looking, handsome, brick and stone edifice. It has magnificent portals revealing a grave courtyard, with cloisters and pillars. It was once a house of trade. Merchants used to assemble here and business was transacted. Now importance is gone, and it is no more than a magnificent relic. The South-Sea House is of interest to lamb because it is so...

    House of Lords, The Lamb, Threadneedle Street 787  Words | 3  Pages

  • london

    International and historic, elegant and avant-garde, London is one of the most diverse and visually exciting cities in the world. Settle into our hotel in fashionable Kensington and set off to capture London’s palpable energy. With your camera in hand, venture into bustling Billingsgate fish market, the Columbia flower market, and iconic Portobello Road. Stroll through serene gardens, and delve into the ethnic neighborhoods of the East End to shoot portraits and street scenes and the restored warehouses...

    City of Westminster, Grade I listed buildings in London, Knightsbridge 896  Words | 3  Pages

  • South of the Slot

    South of the Slot: Essay In my essay, I will explain how much conflict has to do with the story. I will explain conflict in Freddie Drummonds’ point of view. I will also explain it in Freddie’s alter ego “Big Bill Totts” point of view. Finally how Big Bill overwhelmed Freddie and took control over Freddie. Freddie is having a hard time choosing to stay away from the South of the Slot because; he is more comfortable being in the North of the Slot. The North of the Slot represents cleanness, education...

    521  Words | 2  Pages

  • Summary for Jack the Ripper

    “The Hunt for Jack the Ripper” Jack the Ripper was said to be the first serial killer in the modern sense. In the article “The Hunt for Jack the Ripper,” William D. Rubinstein’s main idea is to explain and examined some of the murder victims, and possible suspects for Jack the Ripper. Rubinstein goes into great detail to try and define who the ripper actually was, but this is still an unsolved mystery in history. Rubinstein’s main ideas are the different possibilities for Jack the Ripper; however...

    East End of London, Human sexual behavior, Jack the Ripper 827  Words | 3  Pages

  • London Fashion Week: Summary

    Anna-Mariya Yordanova/The London Fashion Week Circus/1 Whilst the already established names in the fashion industry have secured their participation in London Fashion Week, students and up and coming designers are holding on to their show invitations as if they are clutching at straws. And in reality that small piece of paper is their pass to the overwhelming world of luxury fabrics, glamorous garments, and crazy designs that could almost never appear on the window of a high street-style shop...

    Clothing, Fashion, Fashion capital 1885  Words | 6  Pages

  • Jack London

    Both Chris McCandless and Jack London left to go into the wilderness to find their true selves. They both also had serious family issues, with McCandless’ father having a secret other family, and London’s mother attempting to shoot themselves. It is a possibility that through this they learned that humans are unpredictable, and unreliable, and as a result, they preferred to be in solitude for long periods of time, so that they would no longer be subjected to the random whims of other people. ...

    Alaska, California Gold Rush, Christopher McCandless 457  Words | 2  Pages

  • Jack London Questions and Essay on "To Build a Fire"

    one of the authors that most influenced London, Herbert Spencer. 2. What is socialism? Why was London attracted to it? Socialism is an economic system in which the means of prediction are owned and controlled by the working class. And London was attracted to it because of his experience in life gave him an insight into the terrible effects of poverty on people who had no political power. 3. What is social Darwinism? What were its origins and how did London interpret this philosophy? Social Darwinism...

    Charles Darwin, Cryobiology, Herbert Spencer 1364  Words | 4  Pages

  • Jack London

    Dantean Influence in Jack London’s “To Build a Fire (II)” James I. McClintock has described Jack London’s classic short story “To Build a Fire (II)” as the “most mature expression of his pessimism” (116). In what follows, I wish to explore the possibility that there is a substantial element of spiritual allegory operative in London’s narrative. London originally conceived his tale as a moral fable and a cautionary narrative to American youth never to travel alone. To this end, London published the story...

    Beatrice Portinari, Dante Alighieri, Divine Comedy 3083  Words | 9  Pages

  • Earthquake Madness and Jack London

    Earthquake Madness and Jack London, an Eyewitness Did you know that San Francisco had an earthquake that completely destroyed most of the city in 1906? The Story of an Eyewitness by Jack London is a close up detailed memoir of this event. In 1906, there was a major earthquake in San Francisco that destroyed most of the city. After the earthquake many fires broke out, forcing people out of their homes and businesses, and also there was many fatalities. Jack London uses excellent literary devices...

    1906 San Francisco earthquake, Earthquake, Fiction 628  Words | 1  Pages

  • Jack the Ripper

    The Whitechapel Murders and those of Jack the Ripper are not generally one and the same. Over a period of three years towards the end of the nineteenth century a number of prostitutes were murdered under different circumstances – the murder of prostitutes was not an especially unique occurrence during those times but several of the murders drew particular attention on account of the savagery with which the victim's bodies were mutilated. Within the Whitechapel Murders was a cluster of murders that...

    Central News Agency, Jack the Ripper, Jack the Ripper fiction 781  Words | 3  Pages

  • Jack the Ripper

    Stacie Wyatt Professor Gave Composition 121 26th, July 2012 Jack the Ripper On a late evening over a hundred years ago, a serial killer started his spree of slayings, which would end up being one of the most talked about unsolved killings to this date. By typical philosophies, the eerie slayer who terrified the gloomy streets of London’s East End was nothing compared to serial killers of the present time. How could this one person fascinate a large number of individuals, since there have...

    East End of London, Jack the Ripper, Jack the Ripper suspects 1616  Words | 5  Pages

  • Jack London's “Credo”

    Jack London's “Credo” I would rather be ashes than dust! I would rather that my spark should burn out in a brilliant blaze than it should be stifled by dry-rot. I would rather be a superb meteor, every atom of me in magnificent glow, than a sleepy and permanent planet. The proper function of man is to live, not exist. I shall not waste my days in trying to prolong them, I shall use my time.” – Jack London 1876-1916 Jack London was a man...

    Glen Ellen, California, Jack London, Michigan Stadium 2541  Words | 6  Pages

  • Jack the Ripper

    Jack the Ripper was a murderous madman who terrorized prostitutes in the late 1880�s. Time has not diminished the gruesomeness of the killings. All the victims' throats were cut ;some victims were disemboweled ;and the killer took organs from some of his victims. When fear of the Ripper peaked, the killings stopped, and a century of speculation ensued (jack 1). Many authors have tried to sift through the evidence and have arrived at their own theories as to the identity Jack the Ripper Jack the...

    East End of London, Jack the Ripper, Jack the Ripper fiction 1407  Words | 4  Pages

  • London Biscuits Competitor Analysis

    London Biscuits Berhad Group is a home grown Malaysian company, listed on Main Board of Bursa Malaysia. Its main business idea comprises on manufacturing, marketing and sales cakes and snack food which score high in terms of product safety and quality (London Biscuits Berhad, 2011). According to London Biscuits Berhad (2011), it have own 12 factory premises linked with production, warehouse and office facilities, with 600 persons of employees. Those facilities are strategically located in Johor and...

    Asia, Brand, East Asia 886  Words | 3  Pages

  • Jack London's "To Build A Fire" Analysis

    To Build A Fire – Jack London Analysis Leno Bozzer Ms. A. Timmins ENG 2DAa February 10th, 2014 Questions: 1) In a paragraph of 3-5 sentences, prove that the introduction fulfills its purposes 2) From the three first paragraphs, quote three examples of foreshadowing. 3) Identity two flashbacks in the story. For each flashback, identify its purpose. 4) What is the main conflict in the story? Defend with examples from the plot. 1) All...

    Antagonist, Character, Fiction 1214  Words | 4  Pages

  • Intellect vs. Instinct in "To Build a Fire" by Jack London

    The ignorance of the main character in To Build a Fire by Jack London is what ultimately causes his failure. He has never experienced cold like that of the Yukon Trail but is confidant, regardless, that he will reach his goal of meeting his friends at the campsite. It is the man's determination to follow his intellect rather than his instinct that reveals his ignorance. The man begins his journey relying on flawed intellect. He illogically treks through snow, wetting his boots and feet, and must...

    Freezing, Instinct, Melting point 1366  Words | 4  Pages

  • The South

    While the South was busy with its problems, authors of that era were emerging writing about the troubles of the South and its unwillingness to move forward. Born and raised in New Albany, Mississippi, William Faulkner is in the preeminent position of southern gothic writing. This genre depicts the south as a place permeated with lack of progression. It exposes the American South's inability to move forward along with the industrialized North after the Civil War. Similar to Gothic, Southern Gothic...

    A Rose for Emily, American Civil War, American literature 1211  Words | 3  Pages

  • Jack the Giant Slayer

    Movie Review Jack the Giant Slayer Director: Bryan Singer Lead Actors: Nicholas Hoult (Jack), Eleanor Tomlinson (Isabelle), Ewan McGregor (Elmont), Stanley Tucci (Lord Roderick), Ian McShane (King Brahmwell), Bill Nighty and John Kassir (Fallon). Genre: Adventure, Fantasy Setting: In the Kingdom of Cloister Plot Overview (Summary): In the Kingdom of Cloister, Jack, a young farm boy, is fascinated by the legend of Erik, an ancient king who defeated an army of invading giants from a realm in...

    Bean, Film, Giant 1210  Words | 4  Pages

  • Jack London

    Week 6 1 Week 6 Joseph Robbins HUM 335 Christina Baker April 21, 2013 Week 6 2 1.From “The Slaughter of Pigeons” in Chapter 6, What is the author’s claim about the ethics of hunting? What specific words does the author use to “stack the evidence” for his claim? Knowledge of the characters and their histories is not necessary to appreciate "The Slaughter of the Pigeons" because we can interpret through each character's actions Cooper's underlying message. The villagers firing haphazardly...

    Galway Kinnell 1423  Words | 4  Pages

  • Jack the Ripper

    of unsolved crimes, but none has aroused the allure of Jack the Ripper’. The murders of Jack the Ripper stirred controversy and emotion at the time and continues to stimulate fascination within society, not only because of the vicious nature of the crimes but also due to the impact the Jack the Ripper murders had on society. The crimes by Jack the Ripper highlighted a number of differing views towards women prevalent in 19th Century London. In late 19th Century there was a changing attitude towards...

    18th century, 19th century, Historiography 2275  Words | 7  Pages

  • Jack the Ripper

    Jack The Ripper. What actually happened ? Jack the Ripper has been the most famous serial killer of the world. His story is known everywhere of the world. Not because of the number of people he killed. Not because of the political position of the people he killed. The main reason that he became famous is the modus he used to mutilate 5 victims and he was never caught. So he was also the most horrible killer of the world. The story happened on the east end of London. In the evening of 31st of August...

    City of London, East End of London, Jack the Ripper 1120  Words | 4  Pages

  • Major Theme in to Build a Fire by Jack London

    deterministic world is based on a series of links, each of which causes the next (for more on these causal links, see Causal links and processes, below). In "To Build a Fire," London repeatedly shows how the man does not have free will and how nature has already mapped out his fate. Indeed, both times the man has an accident, London states "it happened," as if "it" were an inevitability of nature and that the man had played no role in "it." The most important feature of this deterministic philosophy is...

    Causality, Determinism, Free will 1360  Words | 4  Pages

  • The Importance of Setting in Jack Londons "To Build a Fire" and Kate Chopins "The Storm"

    into the story. In "To Build a Fire" by Jack London, the setting plays a significant role throughout the entire short story.  London uses certain techniques to establish the atmosphere of the story.  By introducing his readers to the setting, prepares them for a tone that is depressed and frightening.  Isolated by the hostile environment of the Yukon in sub-freeing temperatures, a man falls victim to the unrelenting and unforgiving power of nature, London shows us how the main character of the story...

    Fiction, Jack London, Journey 1471  Words | 4  Pages

  • A Analysis of Jack London Novels

    A literary Analysis of Jack London three most recognized works, Sea Wolf; The Call of the Wild; and White Fang. Jack London lived a full life, even though he died at the young age of forty. In his life time he experienced many things, and I believe that these experiences were the catalyst of his novels. Jack London was an oyster pirate, a government patrolman in San Francisco Bay, a sailor and an agrarian reformer, a seal hunter in the North Pacific and a gold prospector in the frozen...

    Dog, Jack London, Klondike Gold Rush 2925  Words | 8  Pages

  • Summary

    Summary== Colonel Herncastle, an unpleasant former soldier, brings the Moonstone back with him from India where he acquired it by theft and murder during the [[Siege of Seringapatam]]. Angry at his family, who shun him, he leaves it in his will as a birthday gift to his niece Rachel, thus exposing her to attack by the stone's hereditary guardians, who, legend says, will stop at nothing to retrieve it. Rachel wears the stone to her birthday party, but that night it disappears from her room. Suspicion...

    Birthday party, Black-and-white films, Iggy Pop 1517  Words | 4  Pages

  • How, Why and to What Effect Dickens’ Great Expectations Has Been Translated Into Peter Careys’ Novel Jack Maggs.

    How, Why and To What Effect Dickens’ Great Expectations has been Translated into Peter Careys’ Novel Jack Maggs. Translation is defined as a word, phrase or a text in another language that has a meaning that is equivalent to that of the original. It is also defined as a change in form or state of original text. The translation that occurs between the two novels Great Expectations and Jack Maggs is called Intralingual translation, which is defined by Jackobson as “an interpretation from one...

    Abel Magwitch, Charles Dickens, Great Expectations 1562  Words | 5  Pages

  • Transportation in London

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  • Jack the Ripper

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  • Jack London Analysis

    he had saved himself. Those old-timers were rather womanish, some of them, he thought” (London 488). This quote, from “To Build a Fire” by Jack London, allows the reader some insight as to what the attitude of the character is and how London portrays him as an arrogant, ignorant man. The story takes place in the Yukon Territory and supports the theme of man vs. nature, which is developed specifically by London through his characters. In the story, a traveler who is new to the territory foolishly tries...

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  • Scissor Jack

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