• Macbeth
    , and how it was strong enough to overrule all moral, ethical and religious objection. “For mine own good, all causes shall give way: I am in blood, stepp’d in so far that, should I wade no more, returning were as tedious as go o’er.” The metaphor compares his outrageous actions to wading through a...
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  • Macbeth: Blood
    , All causes shall give way. I am in blood Stepped in so far that, should I wade no more, Returning were as tedious as go o'er. Strange things I have in head, that will to hand, Which must be acted ere they may be scanned. (3.4.138-146) B. Paraphrase and Clarification: Tomorrow I will go see...
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  • Swass
    way: I am in blood / Stepp’d in so far that, should I wade no more, / Returning were as tedious as go o’er:" (Act III, Scene 4, Lines 159-161) We now find that Macbeth has entered so far into hell and the world of evil, it is impossible for him to return to righteousness. He will be forced to kill...
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  • Macbeth Essay
    Macbeth states, “I am in blood steeped so far that I should wade no more”. What drives Macbeth to continue on his destructive path? * In the disaster of the death of Macbeth, the witches had a significant influence in his downfall, are not solely to blame. With their definite or clear...
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  • Macbeth Act 3.4
    suspicions now turn to Macduff , who insulted him by not attending the banquet. The end of the scene is a turning point - realising he cannot undo what he has done, he decides to continue with his attempts to eliminate all those whose existence threatens his position; "I am in blood so far that, should I...
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  • Macbeth Critical Approach
    previous status. “For mine own good, all causes shall give way. I am in blood stepp’d in so far that, should I wade no more, returning were as the tedious as go o’er” By comparing his own actions to a river of blood he hints to the fact that once a man kills for his own single benefit, there is no...
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  • macbeth
    Stepp'd in so far, that, should I wade no more, Returning were as tedious as go o'er.” ― William Shakespeare, Macbeth tags: blood, halfway, macbeth, shakespeare, wade 82 likes like “Things without all remedy should be without regard: what's done is done.” ― William Shakespeare, Macbeth tags...
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  • Macbeth
    stepped so far that, should I wade no more, returning were as tedious as go o'er." * Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player that struts and frets his hour upon the stage, and then is heard no more. It is a tale, Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.” * a gentleman to whom I built an absolute trust.”...
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  • Macbeth
    : For mine own good All causes shall give way. I am in blood Stepped in so far that, should I wade no more, Returning were as tedious as go o’er. (3.4.136-139) Speaker: Explanation/Significance: End of the scene 4 : Macbeth reveals that he is sending a...
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  • Use of Imagery in Macbeth by William Shakespeare
    . Another use of Imagery in Macbeth is to show how Macbeth has turned into a monster. After realizing that he has the blood of several innocent people on his hands, Macbeth says “All causes shall give way: I am in blood - Stepp'd in so far that, should I wade no more, - Returning - were as tedious as go...
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  • A Bloody Night
    Macbeth sees the ghost of the murdered Banquo at his feast, he goes into a state of shock and has to be escorted back to his chamber by Lady Macbeth. He tells Lady Macbeth before he goes to sleep, "All causes shall give way: I am in blood Stepp'd in so far that, should I wade no more, Returning were...
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  • Comparison Macbeth and Bigger Thomas
    progresses, and his remorse descends throughout the play. He repents killing king Duncan, yet continues murdering people. By the end, Macbeth reaches his all time high; he becomes pure evil. He even tells Lady Macbeth that he cannot go back, “I am in blood stepped in so far, that should I wade no more...
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  • Blood Imagery in Macbeth
    Lady Macbeth. He tells Lady Macbeth before he goes to sleep, "All causes shall give way: I am in blood / Stepp'd in so far that, should I wade no more, / Returning were as tedious as go o'er:" (Act III, Scene 4, Lines 159-161)<br><br>We now find that Macbeth has entered so far into hell and the...
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  • Macbeth and Death of a Salesman
    a dagger which I see before me, the handle turned toward my hand?” “We have scortch’d the snake, not kill’d it!” “O, full of scorpions is my mind dear wife!” “But now I am cabbin’d, cribb’d, confin’d…” “I am in blood step’t so far that, should I wade no more, retrning were as tedious as to go...
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  • Macbeth
    guilt. “I am in blood. Stepp’d in so far, that, should I wade no more, Returning were as tedious as go o’er” (3.4). This use of blood imagery, as well as sleep imagery “Glamis hath murdered sleep, and therefore Cawdor, Shall sleep no more; Macbeth shall sleep no more” (2.2) conveys Macbeth’s guilt, and...
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  • Macbeth Essay
    didn’t experience this “guilt” when he was killing other innocent people in battle. Macbeth tells Lady Macbeth, after Banquo’s murder I am in blood Stepped in so far that should I wade Returning were as tedious as go o’ver This image of guilt shows to me that...
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  • Macbeth - Blood Imagery in Macbeth
    goes to sleep, &quot;All causes shall give way: I am in blood / Stepp'd in so far that, should I wade no more, / Returning were as tedious as go o'er:&quot; (Act III, Scene 4, Lines 159-161) We now find that Macbeth has entered so far into hell and the world of evil, it is impossible for him to...
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  • Macbeth Essay
    get out. After the death of Banquo, there are a series of times where Macbeth meets the ghost of Banquo. Once Macbeth sees him for the second time, he says, “I am in blood / Stepped in so far that, should I wade no more, / Returning were as tedious as go o’er” (3.4.168-170). Macbeth says that he might...
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  • Macbeth Essay
    into madness and to death after he realizes that the witches prophecy about Banquo’s sons becoming king may come true. Macbeth compares his appalling actions of murder to walking through a river of blood. ‘For mine own good/ All causes shall give way. I am in blood/ Stepp'd in so far that, should I...
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  • Macbeth Blood Imagery
    he said -'All causes shall give way;I am in blood/stepp'd in so far that;should I wade no more/Returning were as tedious as go over' Through all these instances of blood symbolism imagery,it is obvious that 'Macbeth is about blood'(k.Muir)and his deeds are a'convultion of Nature'(Caroline Spurgeon...
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