F&B Operations

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&Chapter 5 Food & Beverage Operations
• • • • • • • • Food and Beverage Management Kitchen Food Operations Bars Stewarding Department Catering Department Room Service/In-Room Dining Trends Introduction to Hospitality Fifth Edition John Walker Copyright ©2009 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 All rights reserved.

Food and Beverage Management
• The director of food and beverage reports to the general manager and is responsible for the efficient and effective operation of the following departments: – Kitchen/catering/banquet – Restaurants/room service/minibars – Lounges/bars/stewarding

Introduction to Hospitality Fifth Edition John Walker

Copyright ©2009 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 All rights reserved.

Food and Beverage Management
• The skills needed by a food and beverage director:
– Exceeding guests’ expectations in food and beverage offerings and service – Leadership – Identifying trends – Finding and keeping outstanding employees – Training – Motivation – Budgeting – Cost control – Finding profit from all outlets – Having a detailed working knowledge of the frontof-the-house operations Introduction to Hospitality Fifth Edition John Walker Copyright ©2009 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 All rights reserved.

Figure 5–1 Food and Beverage Division Organization Chart for a Large Hotel

Introduction to Hospitality Fifth Edition John Walker

Copyright ©2009 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 All rights reserved.

Kitchen
• A hotel kitchen is under the charge of the executive chef, or chef in smaller and mediumsized properties • Some executive chefs are called kitchen managers • Controlling costs is an essential part of operations; as labor costs represent the most significant variable costs, staffing becomes an important factor • Financial results are generally expressed in ratios, such as food cost percentage and labor cost percentage

Introduction to Hospitality Fifth Edition John Walker

Copyright ©2009 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 All rights reserved.

Food Operations
• Restaurant managers are generally responsible for the following: – – – – – – – – Exceeding guest service expectations Hiring, training, and developing employees Setting and maintaining quality standards Marketing Banquets Coffee service In-room dining, minibars, or the cocktail lounge Presenting annual, monthly, and weekly forecasts and budgets to the food and beverage director Copyright ©2009 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 All rights reserved.

Introduction to Hospitality Fifth Edition John Walker

Bars
• The profit percentage on beverages is higher than it is on food items, making bars an important revenue source • The responsibilities of a bar manager include the following: – Supervising the ordering process and storage of wines – Preparing a wine list – Overseeing the staff – Maintaining cost control – Assisting guests with their wine selection – Proper service of wine – Knowledge of beers and liquors and their service Introduction to Hospitality Fifth Edition John Walker Copyright ©2009 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458 All rights reserved.

Bars
• Bar efficiency is measured by the pour/cost percentage • Pour cost is obtained by dividing the cost of depleted inventory by sales over a period of time – Food and beverage directors expect a pour cost between 16– 24%

• Hotel bars are susceptible to the same problems as other bars – All beverage service staff should receive training in responsible alcoholic beverage service – Another risk bars encounter is pilferage – The best way to prevent these occurrences is to have a good control system—which should include shoppers

Introduction to Hospitality Fifth Edition John Walker

Copyright ©2009 by Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle...
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