A More Perfect Union: Usage of Ethos, Logos, Pathos

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  • Topic: Barack Obama, Jeremiah Wright, Jeremiah Wright controversy
  • Pages : 3 (1235 words )
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  • Published : April 29, 2008
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A More Perfect Union: Usage of Ethos, Logos, Pathos
Throughout our history race, religion, and culture have split the U.S. ever since our framers defined our constitution. Since then we can find many examples which break us apart but also characterizes us as Americans. Even in today’s society, sometimes individuals tend to look at others who do not look similar to themselves as an inferior species. Due to these acts of racism and other prejudices against those individuals, many people have raised their voices and agreed that it is time to stop these immoral acts which only break us apart. In March 28, 2008 Senator Barack Obama addressed the nation with one of the greatest speeches ever given; it was not only a wake up call for America but also a starting of a new era. In “A More Perfect Union”, Senator Obama uses ethos, logos, and pathos to persuade Americans to forget the past and start a new chapter as a unified America. One of the reasons why Obama was able to deliver his speech with success was the accurate use of ethos. He begins by telling his “American story” where he states that “[he is] the son of a black man from Kenya and a white woman from Kansas. [He] was raised with the help of a white grandfather who... [served] in Patton’s Army during World War II and a white grandmother who worked on a bomber assembly line...” (1-2). The mention of his background as coming from a black and a white parent helps to set his claim. This claim implies that, since he has the blood of both races, he represents an ideal individual to direct a new era in American history that will be remembered as one of total union. Flawlessly combining into his claim about unity, this example serves to establish a name for his family as being well involved in historical periods of changes in America such as the World War II. He later on mentions that “[his] faith in God and my faith in the American people – that working together we can move beyond some of our old racial wounds … if...
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