A Cup of Joe

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A CUP OF JOE; THE DRAWBACKS AND
POTENTIAL BENEFITS OF
COFFEE TO HUMAN
BODY

A Research Paper
Presented To
Dr. Antonio R. Yango
College of Engineering and Tech-Voc
University of Perpetual Help System Laguna

In Partial Fulfilment
Of The Requirements for the Course
Communication Arts 2

By
De Guzman, Maria Criselda V.
March 2013

Introduction
Coffee, Java or Joe whatever it is called thought to be the stuff of Satan and insurrection; coffee has been lambasted throughout history. In the 17th century, Turkish sultan Murad IV banned it for fear that it made subjects disloyal, while King Charles II complained that British coffeehouses were breeding "false, malicious, and scandalous reports." Two books -- an encyclopaedic volume by Pendergrast and a playful romp by Allen -- suggest that Murad and Charles were right about coffee's potency. With only a little facetiousness, the authors assert that coffee brought about the French Revolution, the poverty of Latin America, and most everything in between. They muster a surprisingly compelling case for their over caffeinated thesis.

Pendergrast, author of For God, Country and Coca-Cola (1994), recounts the story from the berry to the last drop. Folklore has it that an Ethiopian goatherd named Kaldi discovered coffee sometime before the sixth century A.D., when his animals "danced" after nibbling the red berries. By the 16th century, the bean had conquered Turkey, where "a lack of sufficient coffee provided grounds for a woman to seek divorce." In the succeeding two centuries, coffee replaced beer as the drink of choice in Europe. Wired Frenchmen started getting revolutionary ideas; contented beer drinkers, Pendergrast suggests, would never have stormed the Bastille.

Coffeehouses spread during the l920s, when Prohibition shut down bars and sent Americans searching for new places to socialize. Post-war consumerism fuelled the rise of instant coffee, and the hedonistic 1970s spawned a new appreciation for exotic, gourmet coffees. Uncommon Grounds is exhaustive but not exhausting, with anecdotes easing the reader through its 522 pages. (Kwiatkowski, 2000)

"The Birth of Coffee" travels a quarter of a million miles across four continents, from the Old Dutch plantations of Sumatra to the mountains of Costa Rica. As coffee trees grow and are cared for, they produce white flowers with "cherries" containing a seed called the coffee bean. (Lorenzetti, 2012)

This paper will discuss about the risk and benefits of coffee to human body. As coffee stated to increase the risk of developing cancer, heart disease, or type 2 diabetes, this paper will give background to this statement to provide a better understanding about the effect of coffee. Thus workers and athletes as one of the most coffee consumers will also be talk over. Pregnant women will also be confer, as for many people who are curious about its effect. Girls and boys body reaction towards caffeine will also be differentiate. And coffee being an antioxidant will also be highlighted in this paper.

In the story of Cafe Roche, Sarah’s first Coffee experience... My first coffee experience was when I was 14. I had never liked coffee before. My parents coffee always tasted like dirty wet news paper. Growing up in suburban Buffalo NY, my friend Kristen and I were dropped off at the mall for our usual “mall rat” routine. It was a beautiful day out, and Kristen and I were eventually bored with the mall. We decided to walk down to the adjacent plaza. Kristen wanted to show me a cool shop there called Zelt’s Trading Company. It was an awesome store that sold African Art. As we walked in, we saw that Mrs. Zelt’s Son added a coffee shop at the front of her store and called it Culture Coffee. We smelled the aroma of fresh ground coffee. We heard the eclectic music they were playing on their stereo. We saw the comfortable couches that were calling our names to just veg out. There was a random acoustic guitar in the...
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