Young Generation

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i havent got anything to say.
still finding.
i am sure as soon as i get the topic to say i will post it
thank you all.
but i have something to say about young generation problem,
he particular problems of youth were highlighted today as the General Assembly’s Third Committee (Social, Humanitarian and Cultural) continued its review of social development questions. Many countries were represented by younger delegates, whose contributions sometimes drew applause.

The youth representative of Australia ended his statement by imploring the delegates to help young people around the world create a brighter and more united world. “Help us to ensure the branches of youth flourish,” he said.

Most of today’s speakers addressed their progress towards achieving the Millennium Development Goals of the United Nations at what was noted was the approximate halfway point between the year of their adoption, and the year for achieving their implementation, in 2015.

Comparing the state of world progress towards the Millennium Development Goals to half-time at a soccer match, the Danish youth representative said that a commentator watching the “game” would say that the players needed to work harder to win, because in this tough match, the strongest players had remained seated on the bench.

Several countries noted the importance of meaningful employment for all job seekers, and also the central role reducing unemployment had on other indicators of social development such as poverty. Indonesia’s representative said that in addition to promoting employment opportunities for all, States should also promote equal rights and opportunities for migrant workers. Educating the labour force to respect the rights of this vulnerable group of workers was also important.

The representative of Thailand commented that more than just employment was needed; emphasis on education and entrepreneurship went hand in hand with increased labour participation.

Commenting on the economic aspect of social development through employment, the representative of Myanmar said that, with regards to his country, the imposition of unilateral sanctions was an additional burden on the economy, which had forced foreign investors to shut factories within the country. He said this had resulted in undue hardship for workers who had lost their employment as a result of the situation.

Statements were also made today by the representatives of China, Egypt, Sweden, Switzerland, Honduras, Dominican Republic, Qatar, Bangladesh, Finland, Algeria, Brazil, Belarus, Germany, Italy, Iraq, Chile, Gabon, Norway, Slovak Republic, New Zealand, Angola, Viet Nam, Thailand, Kazakhstan, Azerbaijan, Uzbekistan, El Salvador, Morocco, Iran, Israel, Libya, Kenya, Panama, India, Senegal, Syria, Malawi, the United Republic of Tanzania and Eritrea.

The observers of the Holy See and the International Labour Organization also spoke.

The Committee will meet again at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, 10 October, to conclude its general discussion on social development. It will then reconvene at 3 p.m. to begin consideration of its agenda item on crime prevention, criminal justice and international drug control.


The Third Committee (Social, Humanitarian and Cultural) met today to continue its general discussion of social development.

For background information, please see Press Release GA/SHC/3882 of 8 October 2007.


ZHANG DAN ( China) said that with its large population China had made expansion of employment an important element of its macroeconomic and social development policy. It also paid great attention to vocational training and re-employment of laid off workers, and worked constantly to improve the unemployment insurance system. Thanks to rapid economic growth, 5 million jobless workers last year found new jobs, and the registered unemployment rate in urban areas was 4.1 per cent lower than the world average....
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