You'Re Killing Me

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  • Topic: Peoria, Illinois, Advertising, Peoria Journal Star
  • Pages : 3 (1094 words )
  • Download(s) : 95
  • Published : May 5, 2013
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You’re Killing Me

A black child’s face splattered in blood. “You’re Killing Me” written across her face. Don’t Shoot Peoria.com labeled in the corner of her portrait. This describes the 14’x48’ billboard you may have seen along the road on Pioneer Parkway Drive in Peoria. This billboard is only one of many placed throughout the Peoria area to catch the attention of the community. Its intent is to cause viewer’s curiosity and awareness of the Peoria crime fighters’ campaign against gun violence. The Don’t Shoot Peoria campaign is targeting their audience by using billboards, website, and video advertising. The Don’t Shoot Campaign was created to tackle the gang and gun related crimes in the Peoria area. The program was influenced by the book, “Don’t Shoot, One Man, A Street Fellowship, And The End of Violence in Inner-City America,” written by David M. Kennedy. Since August, 2011 Peoria Mayor, Jim Ardis, introduced the Peoria Don’t Shoot campaign to the community. The campaign was introduced via billboard ads featuring the “You’re Killing Me” message. The same ads also debuted on the sides of City Link busses and inside the pages of the Journal Star. There’s also a short video playing on the marquee outside the Peoria Civic Center and commercials airing on TV and the radio. On December 13, 2012 the ELITE law enforcement task force conducted a conference meeting to reach out to gang related individuals as a focused deterrence strategy. According to Peoria County Sheriff Mike McCoy, “Twenty-five men were invited to the call-in. All were on parole or probation. If any had opted not to come they could have faced legal issues and potential imprisonment.” (Peoria Journal Star, December 10, 2012). The goal of this meeting was to bring together the most influential gang leaders in Peoria and to have them spread their support of the campaign. “Six of the twenty-five men have since called about access to job training, alcohol or drug treatment, counseling...
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