Yom Kppur

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Judaism, Halakha, Torah
  • Pages : 4 (1167 words )
  • Download(s) : 32
  • Published : April 5, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Yom Kippur
Aaron Timmons
Rel/134
March, 25, 2013
Maribel Rodriguez

Yom Kippur
Yom Kippur is probably the most important holiday of the Jewish year.
Kippur means “Day of Atonement.” Many Jews who do not observe any other Jewish custom will abstain from work and will fast. This Jewish holiday, no matter what their cultural differences are, will usually attend synagogue services on this day, and worship their God.

The time of year of the holy day
The Jewish calendar is based on three astronomical phenomena, the rotation of the Earth about its axis (a day), the revolution of the moon about the Earth (a month), and the revolution of the Earth about the sun (a year). The Jewish calendar coordinates all three of these astronomical phenomena. Months are either 29 or 30 days, and correspond to the 29½-day lunar cycle. Years are either twelve or thirteen months, corresponding to the twelve point four month solar cycle. The Jewish realized a twelve month lunar calendar was approximately eleven days shorter, and a thirteen month calendar, is about nineteen days longer. A year with thirteen months is called Shanah Me'uberet. October 2, 1997, Hillel II established a fixed calendar based on astronomical calculations and mathematical equations. This calendar is still in use to date. The standardized length of months and the addition of months over the course of a nineteen year cycle, help, so that the lunar calendar realigns with the solar years. Yom Kippur occurs on the 10th day of Tishri of this current calendar. Tishri is the seventh month that which is the civil equivalent September and October and last 30 days (Rich, 2011).

The historic origin of the holy day
The patriarch, Moses revisited Mt. Sinai to get a replacement set of Ten Commandments, because he had...
tracking img