Worldview Analysis (Judaism)

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Judaic Worldview Analysis

APOL 500, Week 6

Student Name
Professor Robinson
03/05/2012

TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION………………………………………………………………………………...3 BASIC SUMMARY…….………………………………………………………………………...3 FLAWS OF THE BELIEF SYSTEM……….…………………………………………………….4 PROPOSED EVANGELISTIC PLAN……………………………………………………………6 CONCLUSION……………………………………………………………………………………7 BIBLIOGRAPHY…………………………………………………………………………………8

INTRODUCTION
Judaism is the religion and culture of the Jewish people. The word “Judaism” derives from the Greek Ioudaismos, a term first used in the Intertestamental Period by Greek-speaking Jews to distinguish their religion from Hellenism. The unifying principles of Judaism are an identity by covenant with God as His “chosen people” based on the Bible (Old Testament) and a unifying expression of this relationship through prescribed tradition. Judaism and Christianity share some commonalities in that both worldviews believe in the monotheistic God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob and the inspiration, authority, and inerrancy of the Hebrew Scriptures. Both worldviews also believe in Creation and the coming of a Messiah. Although Judaism and Christianity share some commonalities, they are two entirely different worldviews. This paper will identify the basic beliefs and flaws of the Judaic worldview while also proposing an evangelistic plan to win Jewish people to Jesus Christ. BASIC SUMMARY

Jewish beliefs are very diverse. There are many categories of Judaism such as: Orthodox, Ultraorthodox, Conservative, and Reform. Devout Jews have two components of authority for truth, life, and teachings: (1) the written law, known as the Torah or Tanakh, and (2) the oral law, known as the Talmud and Mishnah. According to the teachings of Judaism there is no set of beliefs upon the acceptance of which the Jew may find salvation. Judaism places a high level of importance on ethical values and performance of good deeds and actions. Judaism holds that people are basically good because they bear God’s image. Judaism believes that man does not possess a sinful nature, but possesses the capacity to choose sinful acts. Although Judaism as a whole does not officially have a set of beliefs, the Orthodox branch of the community has a set of beliefs put together by Rabbi Maimonides in the 12th century. These beliefs are known as the “13 Articles of Faith.” The summation of the “13 Articles of Faith” is there is only one God and He is unique and eternal; Moses was the greatest of all the prophets and both the oral and written Torah were given to him; God knows man’s deeds and thoughts; there will be a day when the Messiah will return and there will be a resurrection of the dead. Contemporary Judaism often speaks of four foundational pillars of the Jewish faith, each interacting as a major force as part of the covenant: (1) the Torah, always a living law as the written Torah is understood in light of the oral Torah; (2) God, a unity (one), spiritual (not a body), and eternal; (3) the people (Israelites/Jews), called into being by God as members of one family, a corporate personality, a community of faith; and (4) the land (known today as Erez Yisrael), a bond going back to Abraham, the “father of the Hebrew people” (Gen. 17:7-8). FLAWS OF THE BELIEF SYSTEM

The Judaic worldview is incompatible with the Christian worldview in many ways. For one, Christians cannot accept the Jewish view of humanity as basically good. Christians can affirm humanity was created in God’s image, but must also affirm humanity’s fall (Gen. 3) and its need for salvation. The major flaw with this Jewish line of thought is that it hinders Jewish people from recognizing sin has separated them from God. As a result, they do not see their need for salvation. Romans 3:23 (KJV) clearly states: “For all have sinned and come short of the glory of God.” The psalmist wrote in Psalms 51:5 (NIV): “Surely I was sinful at birth, sinful from the time my...
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