Women in the Arab World

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Women's rights in the Arab world
Critical reflection

Back in the day women were not considered human. They weren't allowed to vote, work or have a say whatsoever in the community. A Women's one and only job was to be a house wife, raise the children and make food to please her husband. One would think that this has changed, that 21st century women are much more involved in society, business and politics. All the up heat and recognition women's rights movements and feminist actions are getting would deceive us to think that women are getting the adequate privileges they deserve. However this is not the case at all, at least not in our part of the world.

God did not only create Adam AND Eve, he also created them EQUALLY! Therefore who said engineers are supposed to be men? Who said that politics is a man's thing? At the same time, who said teaching or nursing is a women's is a job? It is society that shaped the roles of men and women based on no rational reasoning. Women today might be granted the rights to vote, to drive, to work or become involved in society in general but those are just basic human rights that shouldn’t be fought for rather should be given. However, women in the Middle East are still not being treated equally as men, especially in the workforce. For starters, in the Arab world, companies still expect people to have a ' personal information' section on their CV in which they are to list their gender, date of birth, marital status and more of discriminate measures. The mentality of having the need to know if it was a male or a female applying for the job has always been and will always be present in the Arab world because people here still think that women aren't capable of doing men's job. The ration of men to women in the Arab workforce is not even close to being proportionate. According to an article on posted in 2003 by the s Middle Business source "Women form less than a quarter of the Gulf's national workforce, and just 29 percent of...
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