Women- Housewives or Breadwinner?

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Women: housewives or breadwinner?
From the beginning of time, women were seen as the companions for men but never equivalent or the leader. God created Eve because Adam was lonely and he needed a companion. They both lived blissfully together as companions. But, over time the companionship slowly transformed to assistant. From my perspective, wives were seen as assistants for their husbands. Anything the husband wants the wife would assist; food, clothing, intercourse etc. Thus, people (mostly males) came to the conclusion that males were the predominant force in society. But, is this a false or true statement? Within Jamaican society, we can see that the female population has more jobs than the male population. I am not saying that the females are more intelligent than the males. This is because there are more males who roam the street and idle the time they have. Most of these males are from the inner-city. “Miguel Street,” by V.S. Naipaul is a book of short stories about people living in the inner-city and the situations and events they experience on a daily basis. After reading the first three stories within the book, I realize that the role of wives within this book is more than wife and caregiver, but also breadwinner which is similar to contemporary society. Most of the females within the book worked for a living while being a wife and a mother. Although Popo did not have any children, his wife was the breadwinner. Popo had a job but he did not make any money. How can a person own a business and can never make any money? By the wife being the breadwinner she would be the predominant force within her marriage. From reading this book, there is no way the males should be considered the predominant force. Most of these males do not work, they just drink rum, play cards and get their wives pregnant or a random woman, and then they purposely make themselves unable to support their children. The narrator would always ask Mr. Popo what he was making and he would...
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