Wireless Industry Swot

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The Wireless Industry in Canada is comprised of establishments engaged in providing telecommunication and/or services over network facilities operated by them. The establishments in the industry can own a network, lease a network, or combined these two facilities (NAICS , 2010). With limited regulatory barriers and availability of mobile technologies, the internal weaknesses of the industry have been overcome by strengths through job creations and investment and the Canadian Market. These internal strengths have led the wireless industry to become what is known as the fastest growing industry in North America and Western Europe.

Traditional telecommunication companies are having a hard time increasing their customer base because of regulatory barriers and availability of mobile technologies (Anwar, 2003). Market capitalization poses a weakness to the industry. However, this trend is more noted in the European and Asia market, and has not impacted Canada the same. During the boom times, telecom companies maintained high market capitalization which signify an industry that is dominated by digital and Internet-related markets and surging consumer demand (Anwar, 2003).

The wireless industry in Canada contributes $39 billion and roughly 300,000 jobs to the economy (CWTA, 2008). With more than $1 billion invested by Canadian wireless carriers in communication infrastructure each year, Canada has become stronger in the investments in the country and its people. The demand for highly skilled wireless communications specialists is so great that Canadian post-secondary institutions are creating programs specifically geared to the wireless industry. Furthermore, the wireless sector offers high value employment with an average salary level of $59,000, compared to a Canadian average salary of $42,640 (CWTA, 2008).

Wireless carriers in Canada now expand their services to 99 percent of Canadians, increasing yearly the mobile phone subscribers (reaching 24 million in September 2010) (CWTA, 2008). Approximately 75 percent of Canadian households have access to a wireless phone, sending approximately 163 million text messages a day. The total wireless revenues in Canada were $16.8 billion in 2009 (CWTA, 2008). With this substantial popularity, the evolution of this market within Canada there are still a wide variety of strengths and weaknesses to be utilized and overcome by those organizations ready to effectively take on the challenge.

Despite facing threats from external factors, the wireless industry is continuously evolving, giving it the upper hand, along with many opportunities. Much of the wireless industries success comes from the constant growth of technology, as well as, consumer demands. Through consumer trends such as going green, our accustomed lifestyle filled with convenience, and rapid increase in the mobile network, the wireless industry and its infinite possibilities have become the future of communication. Thus this ever-changing ability to develop and evolve is a major external strength for this industry. But having total creative licence to try and pull ahead of the competition, the possibilities in regards to innovation are endless.

Green has become more than just a colour in recent years due to the current trend of becoming environmentally friendly and aware consumers. This has become extremely relevant in the wireless industry since, as mentioned by Anne Leonard in “The Story of Electronics”, electronics are “designed for the dump.” (Leonard, 2010) Therefore more garbage means more opportunities for recycling. Not only is this an opportunity to attract and meet consumer demands but, going green in the wireless industry would allow the ability to reuse materials, hence making products less costly. By creating green products, a company would be enabled to remain competitive in their industry to fulfill consumer’s need of convenience, and also...
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