Why Martin Luther Was Disillusioned with the Church of Rome

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In this essay the intent is to point out the reason to why Martin Luther was disappointed with the methods and intention of the Roman Church, his entrance into monastery work. How his Catholic upbringing contributed, his 95 theses on the issue of indulgences, his exile and the work the reformation did to improve the situation, the way the Diet of Worms treated Martin Luther, the way he priests of Rome disregarded Luther’s work, the monastic life he lived before making his breakthrough in his own life.

Martin Luther had two powerful influences in his upbringing. One was his parent’s and teacher’s punishments were because of his love and fear of God. Luther’s father was ambitious for his son; he made Luther take courses that pointed toward Luther becoming a lawyer. Because of the severity of home and school Luther decided to run away to a monastery and probably become a monk. The second influence on Luther’s upbringing was his education, Luther went to a series of schools his father picked for him, but Luther decided the University of Erfurt was where he would learn about philosophy.

Luther was so taken up with the University’s study of the Bible that he dropped his study of law and entered a monastery of Augustinian friars. It is thought that Luther chose to become a monk because of a near death occurrence, or the death of a very good friend. Luther ended up taking monastic vows to cope with pervasive senses of personal sinfulness and fear of an all-mighty, powerful and righteous God. Luther tried praying, fasting, but it didn’t cure his anxiety. The more Luther tried to do for God; he just became more aware of his sinful nature.

Luther’s supervisor, Johann Von Staupitz, told Luther to study the mystics, to surrender to the love of God. Luther decided to have self-examination, he found what he felt for God was not love but hatred, his spiritual crisis then made him commit blasphemy, which was, to him, an unpardonable sin. Luther’s supervisor took a...
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