Why Coal Is Not Bad

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Coal was mined in this country before it was even a country. The first thirteen states appeared on a United States flag after coal mines appeared on our maps. Coal has helped power America for nearly 300 years and has been an essential part of the U.S economy since the turn of the century. It was the first fossil fuel used extensively by humans, and is still vitally important today, generating 39 percent of the world’s electricity, and 49 percent of U.S. electricity. Coal power, an established electricity source that provides a vast quantity of inexpensive, reliable power has become more important as the world is becoming more advanced.Modern life is unimaginable without electricity. It lights houses, buildings, streets, provides domestic and industrial heat, and powers most equipment used in homes, offices and machinery in factories. As you can tell, coal plays a vital role in electricity generation worldwide. Coal is a quick an easy thing to produce, transport and generate. With coal mines located in almost 70 different countries, it is not a problem for the supply and demand. Also, coal supplies in the United States are far more plentiful than domestic oil or natural gas; they account for 95 percent of the country's fossil fuel reserves and more than 60 percent of the world's fuel reserves. Not only that, but the United States has about 275 billion tons of recoverable coal, which could last us more than 250 years if we continue using coal at the same rate as we use it today. So here is the question. Why would you want to get rid of coal fired power plants that give people jobs, is easy to mine and is plentiful and inexpensive for the alternative which is inconsistent and costly?
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