What Can Damage Brand Image

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WHAT CAN DAMAGE TO A BRAND IMAGE? CITE SOME EXAMPLES
An organization’s brand is its heart and spirit. It’s a living thing, to be treasured, cherished and nurtured. It’s your reputation and promise – how you walk and talk and behave in business. It’s about integrity. Even more important, a brand is how others see, perceive and speak of you. It’s not something that can be contrived by a new coat of whitewash or silly, self-serving slogans. An organization’s brand – whether major corporation or entrepreneurial endeavor – is also fragile and can be easily damaged. And, most organizations that suffer from a poor brand image come about it because of self-inflicted actions … such as doing shoddy work, not keeping their word, cheating and lying. Particularly in today’s digital era, with vast information resources at our fingertips, we can quickly determine who has a good brand and who does not. But, can we? A brand is only as good as its weakest link. The bad behavior of an employee, vendor or business partner can damage your brand. And when that happens, it can be like having some clumsy and foolish work associate spill paint on your suit. Your brand becomes tarnished. Permit it to happen enough and your brand could be ruined. In addition, the way of management can damage to the brand such as cutting price, brand extension or brand stretching or unsuitable marketing campaign … But in this Internet Research, I would like to present the two typical reasons that can damage to the brand image. First, cutting prices is and has always been seen as a short-term solution that devalues an established brand and is detrimental to its long-term image and profitability. A less damaging way to gain the attention of the customer seeking added value is for big brands to run highly creative on-pack promotions in-store, allowing them to push for sales and avoid the risk of getting lost in the crowd. Brands may think that once the recession is over they will no longer have to cut their prices to generate sales. But consumer behavior has changed and if brands want to stand out in a crowded supermarket then they must find new ways of catching the eye of the shopper without damaging the credibility and value of the company. Example: End May 2009, Samsung Vina Company held promotions "Crazy Sale" for customers to buy phones with touch Samsung Star with only $ 9.99. However, due to unforeseen problems, the program has become a crowded, clash between hundreds of customers. Not to mention, VIP also want to purchase a cruise line to find their luck through the touch screen gives them a feeling of action and deception. Earlier, thousands of people in Vietnam have also crowded, vied for the Parkson Trade Center on Le Thanh Ton Street to join the "VIP shopping festival" which officially held by the Parkson and Sacombank. Customers hoped to buy a lot of discounts and gifts from the festival. However, many people have been grumbling about having to jostle chaos, especially when changing cards get 4 VIP vouchers worth 150,000 VND, customers always thought security would be off 600,000 or receiving gifts donation valued at but nothing. All of the above examples are the represent of a hundreds price cutting program causing bad effect to the brand image. Second, the failure of extension may come from difficulty of connecting with parent brand, a lack of similarity and familiarity and inconsistent IMC messages. These failures of extension make consumers create a negative or new association relate to parent brand even brand family or to disturb and confuse the original brand identity and meaning. The typical in this situation is the Diesel. Diesel is a well-known jeans brand that has existed since 1978, when it was created in Italy. The company releases several articles of clothing and is highly successful with sales in the hundreds of millions a year. Its stores are located all over the world, and it is especially popular in Italy. Since the brand comes from...
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