Violent Cartoons

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INTO Manchester – IFY University of Manchester Pathway

Dissertation

Title

Violent cartoons:
The impact of cartoon violence on children’s interplay and behaviour

(Submitted in partial fulfilment of the NCUK Key Skills Programme)

7 June 2012

By: REEM AL ALAWI
GROUP S2 – KS 4
NCUK NUMBER: IM-11-0225

Table of Contents

Introduction.........................................................................................................3 Literature Review................................................................................................4 Methodology.......................................................................................................6 Findings...............................................................................................................7 Conclusion and Discussion.................................................................................9 Limitations.........................................................................................................10 Timescale...........................................................................................................11 Bibliography......................................................................................................12

Introduction
The popularity of television has increased rapidly over the past few decades. Nowadays, it is looked at as an essential mean of communication and entertainment for both young and old people. Animated cartoons have played a big part in children’s entertainment industry over the past 80 years (Krish, 2006). Cartoons can be divided into two categories, violent and non-violent. However it is seen that most cartoons contain violence as it is an essential part of cartoon content. As a result, children are more exposed to viewing media illustrating violence today. Research has come up with an evident conclusion that aggressive behaviour is strongly linked to the exposure to violent media (Donnerstein & Linz, 1995; Huesmann & Miller, 1994; Paik &Comstock, 1994; Wood, Wong & Chachere, 1991). Despite the studies carried out in this field, an extremely crucial issue rising is the effects of violent cartoons on children’s actions, reactions and communication with others. The purpose of this paper is to emphasize the effects that violent cartoons carry on children of different ages’ behaviour, interplay and emotions as well as the factors that cause them to do so. This study is important to raise society’s awareness of the negative effects violent cartoons have on children’s behaviours and emotions in both short and long-terms.

Literature Review
Children’s exposure to violent cartoons has concerned and worried society for decades. According to the Cultural Indicators Project carried out in 1967-1968, television violence can be described as “the overt expression of physical force, with or without weapon, against self or other, compelling action against one’s will on pain of hurt or killed, or actually hurting or killing” (Peters & Blumberg, 2002). A more recent study (Blumberg et al., 2008) defines TV violence as any intentional or accidental act demonstrated on television leading to physical or psychological damage, including verbal abuse to oneself or surroundings. Violent cartoons have various effects on children’s emotions, interplay, behaviour and interaction. According to Carnagey et al. (2007), clear evidence was found by the most recent inclusive review of the effects of violent media that “media violence increases the chances of hostile and aggressive behaviour in both immediate and long-term contexts”. The number of hours that American children spend -on average- watching television can be estimated to more than 5 hours a day, which is approximate to the number of hours they spend in school. Increasingly similar cases have been reported in Europe and Asia (Carnagey et al., 2007). Carnagey et al. (2007) add that that the most popular...
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