Hum/114 University of Phoenix Material

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Gregory Jenkins

 Critical Thinking and Creative Problem Solving

The reader has chosen Media Violence as his topic:
Media violence promotes violent behavior is a problem.
(1).The problem is that in the last four decades, the government and the public health amassed an impressive body of evidence identifying the impact of media violence on children. Since 1969, when President [Lyndon] Johnson formed the National Commission on the Causes and Prevention of Violence, the body of data has effectively grown and grown and it leads to an unambiguous and virtually unanimous conclusion: media violence contributes to anxiety, desensitization, and increased aggression among children. When children are exposed to aggressive films, they behave more aggressively. And when no consequences are associated with the media aggression, children are even more likely to imitate the aggressive behavior. The role of media violence in violent crime has been exaggerated is very much an issue Media violence has become a scapegoat, onto which we lay blame for a host of social problems. Sociologist Todd Gatling describes how "the indiscriminate fear of television in particular displaces justifiable fears of actual dangers—dangers of which television ... provides some disturbing glimpses." Concerns about media and violence rest on several flawed, yet taken-for-granted assumptions about both media and violence. These beliefs appear to be obvious in emotional arguments about "protecting" children. So while these are not the only problems with blaming media, this [viewpoint] will address four central assumptions: (Mass Media, 2010).

(2). The reader does believe that the problems and issues were express effectively, because both articles has a point of view. Article one has stated that in the last four decades this has been an on going problem and the data has...
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