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When the child is about five years old he was not afraid of bugs. He was the youngest in his family and he was the only one who did not scream and run across the room whenever a bug came into sight. He would see a bug and he would rush across the room with a shoe and kill the bug with ease. But more and more everyday the boy was becoming more afraid of bugs. No one could figure out why the once courageous boy who would kill any bug whenever you told him to was becoming afraid of the bugs. He had no choice to be afraid or not to be afraid. This is because his brain was picking up signals from his family to be terrified of bugs. his family was not helping him because they figured he was growing up and realizing that bugs were bad. The fear of bugs developed because he saw what the rest of his family did every time a bug came around, so that became his natural reaction. Observational learning is the unconditioned stimulus. This is because he watched what his family did and then started to react in the same manner. Whenever his family would freak out he would start to freak out because he thought it was what he was supposed to do. So over time it just became habit for him to be afraid of bugs. The conditioned stimulus was at the sight of the insect. The unconditioned response was for him to not have fearful reactions to the bugs. So he will be able to kill the bug and not have to run across the house screaming for someone else to kill it. The conditioned response was to have a fearful reaction at the sight of a bug. The child came to the fear because he saw what his parents brothers and sisters would do every time a bug came near them. So over time he watched and saw their reactions toward the bugs. And just being a young child he saw what his parents were doing and thought that it was the right way to react. When he a child he observed the behavior of his family members who acted as models to his impressionable brain. Which cause him to be terrified of bugs for...