Venture Capital in India

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  • Topic: Venture capital, Private equity, Angel investor
  • Pages : 12 (3873 words )
  • Download(s) : 234
  • Published : February 21, 2011
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The main objective of the paper is to depict the challenges faced by Venture Capital Financing firms. Venture Capital is money provided by professionals who invest and manage young rapidly increasing companies that have the probable to develop into significant economic contributors. The Government of India in an attempt to bring the nation at par and above the developed nations has been promoting venture capital financing to new, innovative concepts & ideas, liberalising taxation norms providing tax incentives to venture firms, giving a support to the conception of local pools of capital and holding training sessions for the emerging VC investors. To highlight the Prospects of Venture Capital financing in India. Dr.G.Renuka HOD (Finance)

The BIPD Business School, Ameerpet
Prof G.Ramakrishna Reddy
Principal and correspondent
Sri Ramakrishna Degree and P.G. College, Nandyal


Introduction to venture capital
Venture Capital is a form of "risk capital". In other words, capital that is invested in a project (in this case - a business) where there is a substantial element of risk relating to the future creation of profits and cash flows. Risk capital is invested as shares (equity) rather than as a loan and the investor requires a higher "rate of return" to compensate him for his risk. Venture capital provides long-term, committed share capital, to help unquoted companies grow and succeed. If an entrepreneur is looking to start-up, expand, buy-into a business, buy-out a business in which he works, turnaround or revitalize a company, venture capital could help do this. Obtaining venture capital is substantially different from raising debt or a loan from a lender. Lenders have a legal right to interest on a loan and repayment of the capital, irrespective of the success or failure of a business. Venture capital is invested in exchange for an equity stake in the business. As a shareholder, the venture capitalist's return is dependent on the growth and profitability of the business. This return is generally earned when the venture capitalist "exits" by selling its shareholding when the business is sold to another owner. Venture capital in the UK originated in the late 18th century, when entrepreneurs found wealthy individuals to back their projects on an ad hoc basis. This informal method of financing became an industry in the late 1970s and early 1980s when a number of venture capital firms were founded. There are now over 100 active venture capital firms in the UK, which provide several billion pounds each year to unquoted companies mostly located in the UK. Venture capitalist prefer to invest in "entrepreneurial businesses". This does not necessarily mean small or new businesses. Rather, it is more about the investment's aspirations and potential for growth, rather than by current size. Such businesses are aiming to grow rapidly to a significant size. As a rule of thumb, unless a business can offer the prospect of significant turnover growth within five years, it is unlikely to be of interest to a venture capital firm. Venture capital investors are only interested in companies with high growth prospects, which are managed by experienced and ambitious teams who are capable of turning their business plan into reality. Venture capital firms usually look to retain their investment for between three and seven years or more. The term of the investment is often linked to the growth profile of the business. Investments in more mature businesses, where the business performance can be improved quicker and easier, are often sold sooner than investments in early-stage or technology companies where it takes time to develop the business model. Just as management teams compete for finance, so do venture capital firms. They raise their funds from several sources. To obtain their funds, venture capital...
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