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1.0 Introduction

1.1 Objective

This report has several objectives:
Define vandalism
To analyse the social problem of vandalism in Malaysia
Consider what makes people commit acts of vandalism
Examine the impact on the community
Discuss strategies to prevent vandalism

1.2 Structure of the report

This report start with define the meaning of one of the social problems in Malaysia which is vandalism and more information about vandalism.

The body include the main causes of vandalism, impact of the problem to our society and the ways to solve this problem.

Under conclusion, we summarize all the main points and make some appropriate recommendations in order to prevent social problem of vandalism in our society from become worse.

1.3 Vandalism

Vandalism is the intentional abuse, damage or destruction of any portion of someone else's property or common or shared property such as our residential facilities, furnishings or public property. Though vandalism is usually the result of a deliberate act, it can also occur as a result of neglect or lack of consideration for fellow residents. It includes behavior such as breaking windows, slashing tires, spray painting on public places with graffiti, removing an exit sign and etc. Vandalism is a malicious act and may reflect personal ill will, although the perpetrators need not know their victim to commit vandalism. The recklessness of the act imputes both intent and malice.

Because the destruction of public and private property poses a threat to society, modern statutes make vandalism a crime. The penalties upon conviction may be a fine, a jail sentence, an order to pay for repairs or replacement, or all three. In addition, a person who commits vandalism may be sued in a civil tort action for damages so that the damaged property can be repaired or replaced.

Vandalism is a general term that may not actually appear in criminal statutes. Frequently, these statutes employ the terms criminal mischief, malicious mischief, or malicious trespass as opposed to vandalism. A group of individuals can be convicted of conspiring or acting concertedly to commit vandalism. Generally, the attempt to commit vandalism is an offense as well, but the penalties for attempted vandalism are not as severe as the penalties for a completed act. Penalties also depend on the value of the property destroyed or the cost of repairing it.

Destructive acts will not be excused merely because the defendants acted out of what they thought was a noble purpose. Political demonstrators may exercise their First Amendment rights of freedom of speech and assembly, but if they deface, for example, government property with spray-painted slogans, they can be convicted of vandalism.

The peak period for committing relatively minor property crimes is between the ages of fifteen and twenty-one. In the Malaysia adolescent vandalism, including the wanton destruction of schools, causes millions of Ringgit Malaysia of damage each year. Apprehending vandals is often difficult, and the costs of repairing the damage are passed on to taxpayers, private property owners, and insurance companies. Some states hold parents financially responsible for vandalism committed by their minor children, up to specified limits. These statutes are designed to encourage parental supervision and to shift part of the cost of vandalism from the public to the individuals who are best able to supervise the children who destroyed the property.

Vandals are criminals because they destroy property, waste time and money, and cause suffering and death. There is no single type of vandal. Both sexes and generations are guilty. Most vandalism to private property is committed by male adults. Female adults are the second most frequent offenders. Most vandalism to public property is committed by juvenile males. Female juveniles are second. Over one half of all the crimes associated with vandalism occur in high...
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