University Students' Dilemma

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1 Kenyan and 3 Chinese arrested for cooking snake stew in Naivasha

By Emma Kuria
Kenya Wildlife Services officials in conjunction with police officers on Sunday 27th January arrested 3 Chinese and one Kenyan for killing and eating snakes in Naivasha, Olkaria. The police were acting on a tip- off from a witness; they found the four in the process of preparing snake soup after killing a black mamba in the nearby Hell’s Gate National Park.

According to Naivasha deputy OCPD, Paul Korir, the Chinese who are involved in the construction of Olkaria IV power plant had made it a habit of visiting the park for snakes. He further disclosed that there have been complains from the public the suspects had been eating dogs and snakes in the area.

The suspects were taken to the Naivasha police station together with the exhibit in a cooking vessel for safekeeping. The four will be arraigned in court on Monday.

Investigations in to the incident are still in progress

Kenya traders to sue Netherlands Government over miraa ban

By Emma Kuria
Miraa traders are considering suing the Netherlands government for banning the sale of the stimulant. Netherlands banned the sale of miraa on January 5, following in the footsteps of many European countries, the US and Canada. This is after a UK report released last Wednesday said there was no evidence to link the drug to any health problems, thereby rejecting calls for a ban in that country. The Dutch government cited noise, nuisance by miraa users and littering as some of the reasons behind the ban. Netherlands was the distribution hub for miraa to other European countries and the ban has led to hundreds of packers, transporters and farmers rendered jobless. Prior to the ban, Kenya exported between 18 to 20 tonnes of miraa to Netherlands weekly. The UK now remains the largest international market for miraa with 30 tonnes being exported there every week. The UK's Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs said in its report that khat (as miraa is called in UK) should not be controlled under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971. To protect its only market and improve chances of having the Dutch ban revoked, miraa traders are planning certain measures to address the concerns raised by groups calling for its ban in Europe. "Of most concern is improving output, faster and safer transportation, care for miraa plants, application of pesticides, avoiding school dropouts and child labour. Timely payment for supplies and services be they locally or at the export level, saving regime, investment, hygienic handling and packaging and chewing and distribution habits in London and other markets overseas, new markets and application of Miraa in its natural form," said a statement by Nyamita. Munjuri said the report that Netherlands used to ban the drug had indicated that 90 per cent of those polled did not see a problem with use of miraa. He added that it was therefore "discriminatory" for Netherlands to ban the drug because of minority opinion.

TWO SIDES OF A COIN: THE DOUBLE LIFE OF A UNIVERSITY STUDENT By Emma Kuria
More than ever before, sexual immorality, substance abuse and criminal acts have become the new nightmare among students at local universities. In fact, academic excellence has become secondary to the vices. Whatever it takes, students will go to any length to ensure that they enjoy a luxurious lifestyle and every good thing life brings their way. 'Sexually transmitted degrees'

While a good percentage of students work hard on their academic work, others opt to take the shortcut and collude with lecturers who award them good grades in exchange for sexual favors. Lisa (not her real name), a soon-to-be graduate at a local university in Eldoret, confesses to sleeping around with lecturers for good academic grades. “I did this to get good grades and avoid supplementary exams. I rarely attended classes because I have a day job and it...
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