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Transference

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  • September 2, 2012
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Transference is a key aspect of Psychoanalysis. “Over the years of his work, Freud came gradually to the conviction that transference is the key to successful psychoanalysis. Every client inevitably recreates a pivotal former relationship with the analyst, and the secret is to analyze and resolve this transference neurosis” (Murdock, 2009, 2004 p. 51). According to Dr. Donovan, when Helen was talking about floating down the river, without the experience of family caring about or noticing her, in some way she was talking about her relationship with him. The relationship was represented by the man running beside Helen as she floated down the river. The man running beside Helen along the river was Dr. Donovan rescuing Helen. The man that the Helen recognized running beside her down the river was her former professor, a man whose presence brought her comfort. Helen’s associations with the professor were during a time in her life when she felt safe and things were less complicated. Dr. Donovan explained that he was replacing the pivotal relationship that Helen had with the professor. Dr. Donovan explained to Helen that her current life is like floating down the river. It is comfortable yet it feels like nothing (Murdock, 2009). The professor noticed and paid attention to Helen in the dream. As a result, he attempted to pull her out of the river into a safe, meaningful place. Dr. Donovan is taking the role of the professor. He is attempting to pull Helen into a happier, more satisfying place in her life, through psychoanalysis. References

Murdock, N. L. (2009). Theories in Action:Student DVD to accompany Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy A Case Approach (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson. Murdock, N. L. (2009, 2004). Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy A Case Approach (2nd ed.). Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson Education.