Tower Defense Is for the Win

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Wastewater treatment (WWT) uses many different processes to achieve the ultimate goal of discharging wastewater that meets all applicable regulations. Recently some significant improvements in WWT have been cropping up in the Food and Beverage industry since the composition of this industry's wastewater streams can be very complex, and highly variable, making the treatment QTZ160 Tower Cranes of wastewater quite challenging, especially in the Secondary WWT phase. The demands made on the food and beverage industry are numerous and range from health and financial issues to environmental concerns. Two additional factors are adding to this challenge. First, environmental discharge regulations continue to tighten, making it difficult for some facilities to consistently operate without NPDES violations. Second, climate change, drought conditions and the trend towards water conservation are forcing some WWT facilities to recycle a portion of their water for in-plant use. The end-use of this recycled water may dictate an even higher quality standard than what is required for discharge. Wastewater treatment can be divided into five processes: pre-treatment, primary, secondary, and tertiary treatment then finally disinfection. Secondary WWT is arguably the most important of the processes used in the treatment of waste in the Food & Beverage industry, due to the high and varying levels of soluble and suspended organic matter in the wastewater. Unfortunately, it is also arguably the most complex of the WWT processes, and can therefore create many challenges from an operations perspective. The Activated Sludge Process

The first major development in Secondary WWT was the introduction of the activated sludge process in England in 1913. The activated sludge process combines sewage, a concentrated mass of microbes, and QTZ125A Tower Cranes high levels of dissolved oxygen to promote the consumption of organic content. The activated sludge process is still very widely used,...
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