Tkam Essay

Page 1 of 2

Tkam Essay

By | November 2012
Page 1 of 2
The Story of a Novel
For 50 years, Harper Lee’s novel To Kill a Mockingbird has been recognized worldwide as a classic. It has never been out of print, which is just one of the many signs that prove how imprinted into our society it is. Harper Lee changed the way readers experience the world around them, and certainly raised the bar for what should be expected from classic novels. To Kill a Mockingbird’s legacy will be everlasting, for holds a mirror up to America and shows what truly lies underneath. America has always taken pride in its detailed history, for better or for worse. Many novels have attempted to demonstrate historical events, but none have quite come close to the outstanding perspective of To Kill a Mockingbird. Readers get to see America as it was in the 1930's through the eyes of an untainted, unhindered child. As it has always been told, sadly, racism and prejudice were somewhat of a building block for the founding of this country. The audience experiences this firsthand in the novel as Atticus Finch, a middle-aged lawyer, takes on a case in which he must defend a black man accused of raping a white woman. Circumstantially, the cause for this case would be lost; the black man would be found guilty upon being seen by the jury. As even Reverend Sykes stated, “[he] had never seen any jury decide in favor of a colored man over a white man” (279). But Atticus, an entrepreneur of his own kind, defied the accepted truth and caused the jury to ponder for hours. This was an important moment for both literature and for the well-being of America. It puts into perspective the hardships of African Americans during the 1930’s, which is not something to be taken lightly. Every society has their own mind set of what they consider to be ‘ideal.’ For example, American’s could be loyal, truthful, and courageous; this almost perfectly describes Atticus. Even though obstacles may make his aspirations difficult, he did not stray; he kept pushing forward no matter...