Thesis on World of Warcraft (Wow)

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Chapter 1
THE PROBLEM AND ITS SCOPE
INTRODUCTION

Rationale of the Study

Massive Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game (MMORPG) is quite interesting nowadays. More and more people are addicted to it; players can easily earn money by playing and selling their items or character; players can interact and get to know each other by just playing the game together. There are a lot of MMORPG players whose success is much higher than expected. The study of Nicholas Yee, The Psychology of Massive Multi-User Online Role-Playing Games supports the claim that, “It was found that male users score higher than female users on Achievement and Manipulation, whereas female users scored significantly higher on the Relationship, Immersion and Escapism factors. In other words, male users are more likely to engage in these environments to achieve objective goals, whereas female users are more likely to engage in MMORPGs to form relationships and become immersed in a fantasy environment.” (Nicholas Yee, p14).

Similar observations have been shown by the Filipinos, is that they played MMORPG for a common good reason, money. They tend to get addicted because of high level graphics and challenging quests that the game offers, and playing together with their friends in order to build their teamwork in any circumstances. The reason of having a research on this topic is that, from our own observation some of the ICT students in University of San Carlos don't attend each of their classes just to play these MMORPG games. The researchers want to know why as to what drives the students to play MMORPG games this much. According to Nicholas Yee (as cited in The Psychology of Massive Multi-User Online Role-Playing Games), “As mentioned in the section on time investment, 8% of users spend 40 hours or more in these environments, and 70% have spent at least 10 hours continuously in an MMORPG in one sitting. Both quantitative and qualitative data suggest that a small, but significant, group of users suffer from dependence and withdrawal symptoms” (Psychology of Massive Multi-User Online Role-Playing Games, p23).

As Tyrer (2008:30) said why most people are addicted to play MMORPG, he said that “Initially the linking of the motivational factors of playing an MMORPG to the several models of addiction in order to discover which factor led to dependence was the key objective. But what was found is that all of the motivational factors may lead to an addictive relationship, but it ultimately depends on what type of person you are, and under what physical and psychological influences you are being subjected to, as addiction is abnormality of the behavioral system within the brain in order to counter extreme external factors. Therefore it cannot be quantified into one particular reason as to why MMORPGs are addictive, as it involves a combination of factors that exist externally to the game.” The reason why this study needs to be conducted is to find out what is the main cause on how does a person tend to be addicted into a particular game and how much does it cost.

The researcher’s study focuses on how people turn into a player and goes into an addict mode. Theoretical Background of the Study
Massive Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game (MMORPG) has been growing quickly nowadays. MMORPG is a kind of online game wherein millions of players are able to interact and build a community. Players are represented by an avatar which are they designed according to their likings and used these avatars to move around in the game. Online Games is a kind of game wherein it requires the use of internet to be able to play these game and connect to other players all over the world. Even though online games have been very successful in recent years, only few people knew on how long the online games had existed prior to the explosion of its popularity. The online worlds have existed for nearly as long as the Internet itself. (Russell, 2006).

Yet, in 1996, Massive...
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