The Use of Graphic Novel Styles and Special Effects in Football Advertising

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A dissertation submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Interactive & Motion Design, Atrium, Cardiff School of Creative and Cultural Industries, the University of Glamorgan. No part of work referred to in this dissertation has been submitted in support of an application for another degree or qualification in this University or any other institute of Learning.

Division of Design
University of Glamorgan

June 2010

The following paper explores the uses of graphic novel and comic book style and special effects in advertising for football and relevant products. The paper will begin by looking briefly into the history of special effects and how they have been developed over time, with enhancements in technology helping designers when it comes to advertising. It will look into the history of graphic novels and comic books, and how they have battled through the decades to remain popular to this day, on the shelves as well as on the big screen. Since the turn of the 1990’s, advertising in football has become huge and big companies such as Nike and Adidas have been battling ever since to produce the best advertising campaigns. The paper will look into some of these campaigns, and specifically those that have been influenced by graphic novels, and how special effects and CGI have taken the adverts to a new level. The paper will finish by discussing why such techniques and styles are used in advertising for football, when there is no sustainable link between the sport and graphic novels, and whether they have proved successful.

Contents Page

List of Illustrations


Chapter 1Graphic Novels, Comic Books and Comix3

Chapter 2Advertising Campaigns in Football8

Chapter 3The influence of Graphic Novels and Special Effects13




List of Illustrations
Figure 1: Robert Crumb, Zap! ISSUE 1, 1968
Figure 2: Frank Miller, SIN CITY COMIC, 1992
Figure 3: Frank Miller, SIN CITY MOVIE, 2005
Figure 4: Anonymous, OFFICIAL 1930 WORLD CUP POSTER, 1929
Figure 5: Anonymous, OFFICIAL 1978 WORLD CUP POSTER, 1977
Figure 6: David Sque, ROY OF THE ROVERS, 1985
Figure 7: Brett McManus, ADIDAS EVERY TEAM NEEDS, 2009
Figure 8: Gavin Lamb, ITV FA CUP TITLE 09/10, 2009
Figure 9: EA Sports, ADIDAS EVERY TEAM NEEDS, 2009

Advertising of sport is one of the most common forms of media known to people in this day and age, whether it is for a small event happening in the next few days or a worldwide event happening years from now. Whereas a large portion of the advertising will be made up of footage from existing sporting events and games, more and more use of special effects technology and artistic influence from past designers is playing a part in promoting the games that are seen around the world. Ever since the famous French film maker Georges Méliès began the innovation of special effects in the late 19th Century, the uses of his techniques have been taken advantage upon by people throughout the creative industry. A year after watching his first film, Méliès had purchased himself a camera and started making his own films. By 1986 ‘Méliès had begun combining his knowledge of magic with filmmaking to produce the first “trick” films.’ In 1902 he produced A Trip to the Moon, his most famous film, which ‘employed every trick he had learned or invented’. It was a groundbreaking film, and due to the lack of international copyright laws, and the sheer amount of piracy, it was seen by millions and influenced many filmmakers to not only use his techniques in their own films, but the ‘also began improving on them.’ This way of designing, by continually improving upon what was already out there, meant the use of special effects in films was...
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