The Tyger

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The Tyger

The poem The Tyger by William Blake catches your attention and it makes you want to continue to read. This poem was very well written as it displayed a vast variety of sound devices such as alliteration, repetition and assonance. The poem explores inseparable forces of good and evil. For example in the first stanza, the line “what immortal hand or eye could frame thy fearful symmetry?” it also explores the existence of god through creation.

Alliteration states that in a poem there is a repetition of a certain letter which is distributed throughout this poem. The author writes “Tyger Tyger! Burning bright” and “In what distant deeps or skies”, this causes the reader to pay attention to the poem. The second sound device is the use of repetition. The author attempted to contradict god hierarchy and the creation of humanity. “Tyger! Tyger! Burning bright, in the forests of the night” and “What immortal hand or eye” The importance of the repetition is that it states both the ideas of good and evil in the world through the creations of god. Assonance is the repetition of vowel sounds to create internal rhyming within phrases or sentences. For example “the fire of thine eyes” In this line, the “i” in fire and thine and the first “e” in eyes create the assonance.

He also uses words the cause your imagination to create what you think and know a tiger looks like. Tigers are dangerous creatures who and what was the creator thinking to create such an animal. He continues from the beginning of the poem to use rhythm he makes the sentences short and repeats words so the poem falls into place over and over. The use of the sound devices make you imagine even more of what this animal can do and the mention of the lamb which is generally looked at as an innocent animal just emphasizes the harshness of the Tyger. “Did he who makes the lamb make thee.” This makes you wonder why a person could make two different creatures. From the beginning of the poem the use of...
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