The Three Little Pigs

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  • Topic: Three Little Pigs, 2007 singles, 2004 albums
  • Pages : 5 (1992 words )
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  • Published : November 4, 2011
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The Three Little Pigs is a story most of us will recall hearing during our childhood years. Looking deeper into the story we will see the message behind the story . There are consequences to the decisions we make and sometimes we have to learn things the hard way. Greed and laziness are undesirable characteristics to possess, while hard work and careful planning are very positive characteristics. The following story of “The Three Little Pigs” is from Andrew Lang’s Green Fairy Book.

There was once upon a time a pig who lived with her three children on a large, comfortable, old-fashioned farmyard. The eldest of the little pigs was called Browny, the second Whitey, and the youngest and best looking Blacky. Now Browny was a very dirty little pig, and I am sorry to say spent most of his time rolling and wallowing about in the mud. He was never so happy as on a wet day, when the mud in the farmyard got soft, and thick, and slab. Then he would steal away from his mother's side, and finding the muddiest place in the yard, would roll about in it and thoroughly enjoy himself. His mother often found fault with him for this, and would shake her head sadly and say: 'Ah, Browny! some day you will be sorry that you did not obey your old mother.' But no words of advice or warning could cure Browny of his bad habits.Whitey was quite a clever little pig, but she was greedy. She was always thinking of her food, and looking forward to her dinner; and when the farm girl was seen carrying the pails across the yard, she would rise up on her hind legs and dance and caper with excitement. As soon as the food was poured into the trough she jostled Blacky and Browny out of the way in hereagerness to get the best and biggest bits for herself. Her mother often scolded her for her selfishness, and told her that some day she would suffer for being so greedy and grabbing.Blacky was a good, nice little pig, neither dirty nor greedy. He had nice dainty ways (fora pig), and his skin was always as smooth and shining as black satin. He was much cleverer than Browny and Whitey, and his mother's heart used to swell with pride when she heard the farmer's friends say to each other that some day the little black fellow would be a prize pig.Now the time came when the mother pig felt old and feeble and near her end. One dayshe called the three little pigs round her and said: 'My children, I feel that I am growing old and weak, and that I shall not live long. Before I die I should like to build a house for each of you, as this dear old sty in which we have lived so happily will be given to a new family of pigs, and you will have to turn out.

Now, Browny, what sort of a house would you like to have?'
'A house of mud,' replied Browny, looking longingly at a wet puddle in the corner of the yard.
'And you, Whitey?' said the mother pig in rather a sad voice, for she was disappointed that Browny had made so foolish a choice.
'A house of cabbage,' answered Whitey, with a mouth full, and scarcely raising her snout out of the trough in which she was grubbing for some potato-parings.
'Foolish, foolish child!' said the mother pig, looking quite distressed. 'And you, Blacky?' turning to her youngest son, 'what sort of a house shall I order for you?'
'A house of brick, please mother, as it will be warm in winter, and cool in summer, and safe all the year round.'
That is a sensible little pig,' replied his mother, looking fondly at him. 'I will see that the three houses are got ready at once. And now one last piece of advice. You have heard me talk of our old enemy the fox. When he hears that I am dead, he is sure to try and get hold of you, to carry you off to his den. He is very sly and will no doubt disguise himself, and pretend to be a friend, but you must promise me not to let him enter your houses on any pretext whatever.' And the little pigs readily promised, for they had always had a great fear of the fox, of whom they had heard...
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