“the Steady Uprising of Advertisement”

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“The Steady Uprising of Advertisement”
In today’s society there are a plethora of ideas about advertisement. What would it take to meet societies want’s with the increase in advertising of new technology? In regards to four articles: “What’s Changed” by , Jane Hammerslough, “Urban Warfare” by, Kate MacArthur & Hilary Chura, “The Age of Reason” by, Kenneth Hein, “The Buzz on Buzz” by, Renee Dye. These four authors describe the many different angles that can be approached by advertisement. They have also shown some great aspects of the new uprising development of advertising technology in modern American society.

In Jane Hammerslough’s article, “What’s Changed”, from Next Text Making Connections Across and Beyond the Discipline’s, she discusses how technology has impacted our choices and how many we have in today’s society. American society has taken a turn in wanting more choices overall. “The accelerated pace of technological developments over the last three decades brings up new needs and different, possibly more efficient, solutions…What’s different now, however, is that today’s frenetic pace involving an infinite, ever-changing variety of material solutions”(Hammerslough 314). Hammerslough gives reference to this theory in a past experience she had with a neighbor in the early 1990’s who had previously been released from jail. Hammerslough comes to the realization of just how much technology has changed in the last decade; her neighbor has been in prison when he discovers a selectric typewriter that has been outdated for some time without his knowledge. Hammerslough mentions that changes occur and our survival may depend on adapting and learning new technologies. Hammerslough also uses an example of the production of car sales in the early days of automobiles; Henry Ford made it a simple, “take it or leave it” approach stating that “a consumer could have a model T in any color he wanted- so long as it was black” (Hammerslough 315). As opposed to today...
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