The Popularity of Teachers

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REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE
The researcher has found the following studies and literature as relevant to the system being proposed. FOREIGN LITERATURE
Teacher education is a commonly studied predictor of quality in early childhood classrooms and it has been consistently associated with teacher effectiveness in early childhood classrooms (Bowman et al., 2001; de Kruif et al., 2000; Helburn et al., 1995). Teachers can be popular just because they are friendly and helpful, but to be truly professional and effective they need other qualities. Students may not be able to put their finger on just why one teacher is more effective than another but we need to be able to identify the skills and behavior we require in a true professional. Teachers can be popular just because they are friendly and helpful, but to be truly professional and effective they need other qualities. Students may not be able to put their finger on just why one teacher is more effective than another but we need to be able to identify the skills and behavior we require in a true professional. Proper preparation is another crucial requirement of professionalism. When the teacher enters the classroom s/he should have all the required materials and the lesson plan ready. Nothing is sloppier than poor preparation.

Interaction with the group needs professional standards of behavior: polite, firm and fair just about sum it up. And in orchestrating the class the teacher must give everyone their chance to contribute and should be flexible enough to modify lessons if they are obviously not going to plan. Indeed a fall-back position is part of good planning.

It stands to reason also that teacher must observe punctuality and appropriate tidiness and dress: it is not possible to demand such behavior from students if the teacher doesn’t set the standards. Indeed I can remember occasions on which students have complained to me about “scruffy” teachers. Since the 1920s, the issue of teachers’ qualifications, which can guarantee their effectiveness, has been of concern for not only the science of Pedagogy, but also for those in charge of staffing schools with qualified professionals. As regards this issue, modern studies have revealed that the way in which a teacher carries out his work is determined by the union of his personality traits and acquired knowledge. A “good teacher” should possess a wide range of qualifications, which could, schematically, be classified as follows: Ι. Personality traits, attitudes and beliefs

These include personality traits related to the professional role of a teacher, which can be nurtured and developed through initial education and continuous training (Whitty 1996: 89-90). Specifically, studies have shown that traits such as flexibility in terms of the appearance of students, a sense of humour, a sense of fairness, patience, enthusiasm, creativity, care and interest in the students, all contribute to the effectiveness of teachers (Malikow 2005, Harslett et al. 2000). These also include a teacher’s attitudes and beliefs on teaching, learning, his role, all of which affect the way he chooses, evaluates and comprehends the knowledge acquired, as well as the way he benefits from this knowledge in practice, as this very practice is shaped by that knowledge (Feiman-Nemser 1990, Schön 1983, Zeichner & Liston 1996). The attitudes of teachers affect their degree of commitment to their duties, the way they teach and treat their students, as well as how they perceive their professional growth (Chen & Rovegno 2000, DarlingHammond 2000). Specifically, teachers that have high expectations for their students and insist on promoting learning for all students tend to be more effective ( Malikow 2005, McBer 2000). Another factor which contributes to the effectiveness of teachers is a feeling of commitment to the job at hand (Coladarsi 2002) and interest in the personal life of students and their families (Harslett et al. 2000). Lastly,...
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