The Outsiders Film Critique

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 175
  • Published : February 11, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Robby Reyes
Mr. Fountain
Film Study III/Period 5
11 February 2013
The Outsiders Movie Critiqued Correctly
The Outsiders did not fit the criteria of being one of the films of Francis Ford Coppola. Critics were largely unimpressed by the movie but did well enough at the box office. The Outsiders was based off the novel, published in 1967, by S.E. Hinton. It is about a character, Ponyboy, who lives with his two brothers, Darry and Sodapop. All of them battle class warfare along with their fellow group known as the Greasers, the poor kids, against the Socs, the rich kids. The movie by Francis Ford Coppola, The Outsiders, was correctly critiqued as unimpressive because it negatively gave viewers a different viewpoint on the stereotypes about teenagers, it did not have the same elements in comparison to the other Coppola films, and the presentation of the settings of the film was poor.

First off, the stereotypes of teenagers during this time period, the 1980s, were different from what was depicted in The Outsiders. “Still others, as it appears, had simply forgotten what it was like to be a teenager, when every tear is a veritable epic of pain” (Dargis 6). The movie broadcasted to the viewers that teenagers do different things and were actually different to what was actually thought about them. “It’s [The Outsiders] about class warfare between rich kids (the “Socs”) and poor kids (the “Greasers”)” (Ebert 3). The movie suggests that teenagers during the time period are always fighting against each other, always in gangs, and always looking for trouble. It gives a different point of view at teenagers when it is not even really true.

Additionally, Francis Ford Coppola’s films have much life in them and spontaneity, unlike The Outsiders because his style did not fit in to the movie. “The problem with seeing characters in a highly stylized visual way is that it’s hard for them to breathe and move and get us involved in their stories” (Ebert 5). Coppola’s filming...
tracking img