The Old Man and the Sea Book Review

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Book review: The Old Man and the Sea.
Written by Ernest Hemingway in 1951 (published 1952). The Old man and the Sea is perhaps one of his most famous works, which won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1954.

“You did not kill the fish only to keep alive and to sell for food, he thought. You killed him for pride and because you are a fisherman. You loved him when he was alive and you loved him after. If you love him, it is not a sin to kill him. Or is it more? -You think too much, old man, he said aloud.”

This is a piece of the text from The Old man and the Sea. This is at the end of the book, when the head character thinks aloud to himself.

Santiago is an old man who lives in a little village near Havana on the of island Cuba. Santiago is a very unlucky fisherman; he has not caught a fish for eighty-four days. The old man’s apprentice Manolin has known Santiago since he was five. Now Manolin’s parents have forbid him to sail with the old man and join a more successful boat. Santiago understands why Manolin wants to change, but Manolin wishes that he could stay with the old man, because he love him as both a friend and second father and he was Manolin’s teacher.

However, Santiago is all by himself now, and on the morning of the eighty-fifth day he takes his skiff and sails out in to the great Gulf. This day he will go much further than all the other fishermen. Santiago is confident the he will catch fish today, because he believes that eighty-five is a lucky number. When the sun rises, he catches sight of a bird that has found some baitfish. Santiago changes his course, because where the baitfish are, bigger fish can be found.

Suddenly he feels something in one of the lines that hangs from the skiff; it must be the big fish that he had waited eighty-four days to get, and sure it is. When the great fish takes the bait the old man starts to pull the line, but the fish is strong and the skiff starts to move away from shore, and Santiago...
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