The Medical Breakthrough of Stem Cell Research

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The Medical Breakthrough of Stem Cell Research

English IV K- 4
27 January 2013
The Medical Breakthrough of Stem Cell Research
Someone you care about is suffering from heart disease, juvenile diabetes, Alzheimer’s, or even forms of cancer and the only hope may be through stem cell research. Would, or should, you support this study? You, like many researchers and scientists, should have great hope for stem cells and its ability to cure heart disease, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. Stem cell research, to begin, is a relatively new process that takes primordial human cells and develops them into a variety of cells like those of the brain and blood. Stem cell researchers are able to work with both embryonic and adult stems cells which have the potential to differentiate into the tissue of almost any organ. Due to this very fact, the people of the United States and its Federal government should continue the studies of such revolutionary ideas like those of stem cell research.

This research is a ground breaking concept that can be used to save lives, conduct cancer studies, ensure a promising future, and promote economic stability. Stem cells are the brilliant building blocks in the human body that can be used to save lives. To this day stem cells have helped successfully treat more than eighty diseases. This is possible because “stem cells are cells that can generate [copies] and become one of the many cell types in the body” (Peduzzi). In other words, the human body has over 200 different types of cells throughout it, and stem cells have the potential to replace them by initially duplicating or transforming themselves into a different tissue type and function. So, for example, if a person was experiencing a depletion of blood cells, stem cells may take on that particular role and can be used to replace the missing cells. James Thomson, the director of regenerative biology at the University of Wisconsin School of...
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