The Man in a Case

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  • Topic: Love, 2007 films, Marriage
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AN ANALYSIS OF ELEMENTS OF
“THE MAN IN A CASE” BY WENDY WASSERTEIN

ARYA FRIZANDIKA
1005121046

ENGLISH STUDY PROGRAM
LANGUAGE AND ART DEPARTMENT
EDUCATION AND TEACHING TRAINING FACULTY
RIAU UNIVERSITY
2013
I.Introduction

“The Man in a Case” is a drama authorized by a well-known American playwright, Wendy Wasertein. Simply, this drama told about an optimism aproach of Byelinkov and Varinka. This is a love story which can tell the audience how human beings can find their love in any different forms and ways. We also can find so many social struggles of this drama that is published in 1986. Wendy Wassertein was born on October 18th, 1950 in Brooklyn, New York. She received the Tony Award for Best Play in 1989, and also Pulitzer for in the same year for one of her drama. She has published so many great creation, such as 11 plays, 2 screenplays, 5 books, and an essay. So far, she has gotten 9 awards for all of her works which most of them discuss “the struggle between falling for convention and finding personal satisfication.” (Wilson). She passed away on January 30, 2006 in New York in age 55 year-old.

II.Conntain

A.Dialogue
The Man in a Case
By Wendy Wasserstein   

BYELINKOV. You are ten minutes late.
VARINKA. The most amazing thing happened on my way over here. You know the woman who runs the grocery store down the road. She wears a black wig during the week, and a blond wig on Saturday nights. And she has the daughter who married an engineer in Moscow who is doing very well thank you and is living, God bless them, in a three-room apartment. But he really is the most boring man in the world: All he talks about is his future and his station in life. Well, she heard we were to be married and she gave me this basket of apricots to give to you. BYELINKOV. That is a most amazing thing!

VARINKA. She said to me, Varinka, you are marrying the most honorable man in the entire village. In this village he is the only man fit to speak with my son-in-law. BYELINKOV. I don't care for apricots. They give me hives.

VARINKA. I can return them. I'm sure if I told her they give you hives she would give me a basket, of raisins or a cake. BYELINKOV. I don't know this woman or her pompous son-in-law. Why would she give me her cakes? VARINKA. She adores you!

BYELINKOV. She is emotionally loose.
VARINKA. She adores you by reputation. Everyone adores you by reputation. I tell everyone I am to marry Byelinkov, the finest teacher in the country. BYELINKOV. You tell them this?
VARINKA. If they don't tell me first.
BYELINKOV. Pride can be an imperfect value.
VARINKA. It isn't pride. It is the truth. You are a great man! BYELINKOV. I am the master of Greek and Latin at a local school at the end of the village of Mironitski. ( Varinka kisses him. )
VARINKA. And I am to be the master of Greek and Latin's wife! BYELINKOV. Being married requires a great deal of responsibility. I hope I am able to provide you with all that a married man must properly provide a wife VARINKA. We will be very happy.

BYELINKOV. Happiness is for children. We are entering into a social contract, an amicable agreement to provide us with a secure and satisfying future. VARINKA. You are so sweet! You are the sweetest man in the world! BYELINKOV. I'm a man set in his ways who saw a chance to provide himself with a small challenge. VARINKA. Look at you! Look at you! Your sweet round spectacles, your dear collar always starched, always raised, your perfectly pressed pants always creasing at right angles perpendicular to the floor, and my most favorite part, the sweet little galoshes, rain or shine, just in case. My Byelinkov, never taken by surprise. Except by me. BYELINKOV. You speak about me as. if I were your pet.

VARINKA. You are my pet! My little school mouse.
BYELINKOV. A mouse?
VARINKA. My sweetest dancing bear with galoshes, my little stale babka. "...
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