The Legislative Branch

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Our Government:
The Legislative Branch

Tiara Abrams

American Government
Mr. DiCurcio
6 December 2010
Outline
THESIS: The Legislative Branch consists of the House of Representatives and the Senate which forms the United States Congress; the Constitution grants Congress the single authority to pass legislation and declare war, the right to approve or reject Presidential appointments, and significant investigative powers. I. What is the Legislative Branch?

A. It includes the House of Representatives and the Senate (Congress). B. The requirements for both chambers.
C. It makes the laws.
II. The Legislative Process
A. The first step in the legislative process is the introduction of a bill to Congress. B. A bill must pass through both houses of Congress before it goes to the President for consideration. III. Powers Of Congress

A. All legislative powers in the government are controlled by Congress; making new laws or changing existing laws. B. The powers of Congress fall into three categories: special, implied, and expressed.

Our Government:
The Legislative Branch

What is the Legislative Branch? Article I of the Constitution talks about the Legislative Branch. The Legislative Branch is the branch of the federal and state governments empowered to make the laws that are the enforced by the executive branch and interpreted by the judicial branch. The Legislative Branch consists of the House of Representatives and the Senate which forms U.S. Congress. If a state's population increases, that means the number of representatives increases also. There were 59 members at the first session of the House of Representatives. Today the House of Representatives consists of 435 members divided among the 50 states. Members of this house are elected every two years and must be at least 25 years of age. Also they must be a U.S citizen for at least seven years. The House has quite a few powers such as initiating revenue bills, and electing the President in an electoral tie. Now the Senate consists of 100 senators, 2 for every state. To become a senator, you must be at least 30 years old, a U.S citizen for at least nine years, and resides in the state that you represent. Senators are elected to six year terms by the people. Only the Senate can approve or reject treaties and presidential nominations for government offices. Senators terms are spread over a period of time so about one third of the Senate is up for reelection every two years. The vice president may cast the decisive vote in an event of a tie in the Senate because he serves as President of the Senate. In order to pass a law and send it to the President for his signature, the House of Representatives and the Senate must both agree on the law. If the President vetoes a law, they may overrule his veto by passing that law again in each chamber with at least two thirds of each body voting in favor. The Legislative Process

The Legislative Process officially begins with a proposal in one of four forms: Bill, Joint Resolution, Concurrent Resolutions, and Simple Resolutions. But bills are the most common so I’m going to talk about the bill. The first step in the legislative process is the introduction of a bill. Members of the House of Representatives and the Senate both come up with a bill for consideration by the Congress. The President, head of a Federal agency, or a member of a cabinet can also propose legislation. When a bill is introduced, the title of the bill goes in the House Journal and printed into the Congressional Record. The clerk assigns the bill a legislative number and the Speaker of the House assigns the bill to the appropriate committee. Next, the bill is debated on the floor and then sent to the committee. Once the bill is revised, it is brought before the House of Representatives and Senate for consent again. The bill may be referred to a conference committee - committee composed of both the House...
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