The Internal Migration Policy of the Eu

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The internal migration policy of the
European Union

Table of Contents
1Statement of independent work2
2Preface, Introduction3
3History, Development and Policies5
4Recent results5
4.1Meeting in Tampere6
4.2Schäuble-Sarkozy paper6
5Living Europe Safely – Work program for the German EU Presidency (1.1.07–30.6.07)8 5.1Fighting illegal migration; preventing visa fraud8
5.2Improving returns8
5.3Protecting refugees – expanding cooperation8
5.4Managing legal immigration9
5.5Protecting the external borders – strengthening FRONTEX9 6Austria and migration9

Statement of independent work

I declare that I drew up this paper totally independent and without the help of anybody else. I did not use other sources than indicated and ensure that I made a literal note of those sources I did use.


Preface, Introduction

I’d like to say that this topic lies at my heart, especially because I come from a city in Upper-Styria, which has a major problem with migrants (13.5% migrants, estimated number of unreported cases is almost double the amount). People have prejudices and aren’t feeling safe any more. Crimes and fights increased drastically; most of them actually are racial conflicts. That’s the reason why I’d like to concentrate on this tropic.

First of all I’d like to start with a definition of migration. I looked it up in the dictionary and found this:

The process by which, over a period of time, people living in one area gradually move into another region perhaps some distance away. Such movements occur mainly through the physical transfer of small groups (families and extended families) at a time, the incomers making their new homes in the midst of the existing occupants of the area, although as the migrants become the dominant social group various social tensions may build up.

Since the foundation of the EU, a lot has changed for the European countries. Even though there are still some opponents and critics, we can clearly see that the EU brought a lot of advantages and made the country richer and better to live in. Austria joined the EU in 1995 and now, 12 year later, we can outline the positive, as well as the negative things, that occurred. I’d like to focus on a particularly serious topic, which became a huge problem in the last few years, namely the problem of migration in Europe.

Particularly the middle of Europe (among others Germany, Austria and France), has been a major pole of attraction for migrants, and still is. This is mostly because of the region’s relative prosperity and its respect for human rights and the rule of law.

The European Union and its Member States face enormous pressure from illegal immigration, as people from third-world countries seek to enter the EU, often at risk to their lives and by relying on human smugglers who take advantage of them. The high numbers of desperate boat people from Africa landing on the shores of Southern Europe have shocked European societies. Illegal immigrants are trying to get in; not only via the EU’s southern sea borders, but also at its eastern and south-eastern land borders. People from the poor countries often think that the EU regions are wonderful places to live in, they associate it with paradise. Obviously they have nothing to lose and risk everything to come to Europe, no matter what it takes. Suddenly, when they have made their way to a richer country, they will recognise that it’s not that easy to survive as they have thought. So the only way to get through the day is to deal with some illegal matters. That results in crime, violence, anger and fear, so a huge lack of safety for everybody.

Consequently enough, the EU considers migration to be one of the most visible challenges of globalisation. The EU realised that it’s important to actively design a widespread European migration policy to work together on managing migration and to find a way for Member...
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