The Insanity Plea by Winslad and Ross: Summary

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The Insanity Plea by Winslad and Ross: Summary

The Insanity Plea is a book about the Uses & Abuses of the Insanity Defense in various cases. The book is by William J. Winslade and Judith Wilson Ross. In this report, I will basically summarize the book and tell you different ways people have used and abused the Criminal Justice System using The Insanity Plea.

I will first talk about the case of Dan White. On November 18, 1978, Preliminary reports began broadcasting news of the events in a town called Jonestown, at first all that was known, was that people of a religious cult shot and may have even killed California Congressman Leo Ryan. Then on November 27, 9 days after the news of the death of Congressman Ryan another 2 deaths happened. George Moscone, the mayor of San Francisco, and Harvey Milk, a city supervisor and the leader of San Francisco's politically active gay community, had been shot and killed at death in the San Francisco City Hall. The Police then sniffed-out and charged Dan White with the murders of the 3 people.

In 2 years the trial ended with the verdict of guilty on the account of manslaughter. He was later sentenced to 7 years and 8 months in a Prison, with a possibility of parole after 5. After the verdict there were Riots breaking out in the streets because of the verdict. Before hand he was elected a Supervisor and resigned because he didn't like the way that Politics worked. The point before, that I may not have mentioned, is that the defense argued that he was insane and that "a person with a normal background who was brought up in a good home, something is obviously missing." Since he was being charged on 3 accounts of Murder in the 1st, they somewhat bought the insane defense so they lowered his charges to 1 account of voluntary manslaughter, where he received 7 years and 8 months with a possibility of parole after 5 years.

In the summer of 1978, Lyman Bostock seemed to have it made very good. He was one...
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