The Fulfillment of the Day of the Lord

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Liberty University

Research Paper
The Fulfillment of The Day of the Lord

An Assignment submitted to Dr. Eunice Abogunrin
In Partial Fulfillment of the requirements For
The course Theo 530

Liberty baptist Theological seminary

By
Andrew James Paterson
22781155

Lynchburg, Virginia
Friday, May 4, 2012
THESIS STATEMENT

This purpose of this paper is to address the meaning and significance of the Day of the Lord, that there is a future fulfillment in addition to the past fulfillment of the Day of the Lord and why it is still relevant for people from now until the second coming of the Lord..

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Thesis Statement…………………………………………………………….……..…….2 Introduction……………………………………………………………….…….….…….4 Significance of the Day Of the Lord ………………….....……………….......…….……4 The Day Of The Lord In The Old Testament:

A Day For Retribution And Punishment ..……………………………………………….5 The Day Of The Lord In The Old Testament:
A Day for the Just……………….…….. ..……………………………………………….10 The Day of the Lord in the New Testament….…………………………………………..11 ‘The Day’ Refers to the Judgment Seat Of Christ………………………………………..12 Overcoming Controversy of the Day of the Lord .………………………………….……13 Conclusion………………………………………..………………………...…………….15 Bibliography….…………………………………..………………………...…………….16

INTRODUCTION
Although theology scholars, such as J. Bergman Kline, maintain that “the messianic mission ushered in the eschatological era” and is accepted as the “thrust of the New Testament revelation,” there is the thought that “the death and resurrection of Christ constituted a fulfillment (or rather, the fulfillment) of the Day of the Lord concept.” C.H. Dodd was an ardent proponent of this realized eschatology movement, which is also referred to as the ‘preterist approach.’ “Jesus’ message was not a future coming and a future kingdom; rather, with the advent of Jesus, the kingdom of God had already arrived.” The study and preponderance of Eschatological thought has seen a marked increase in the late nineteenth century and throughout the twentieth century. “Whether [the concept of the Day of the Lord] was originally eschatological in character is still being debated.” The question being addressed here is, has the Day of the Lord already seen its entire fulfillment and/or should there be the expectation that there is a future, eschatological fulfillment of the Day of the Lord? SIGNIFICANCE OF THE DAY OF THE LORD

Sigmund Mowinckel wrote that the “eschatological Day of Yahweh is only the final and supreme day of Yahweh’s enthronement, entirely secondary to His cult day.” More recently, von Rad has claimed the Day of Yahweh to be “as a pure event of war, with imagery going back to the holy wars of Yahweh in which He appeared personally to annihilate His enemies.” Although the ‘Day of the Lord’ is sometimes viewed as a ‘Day of mystery,’ some theologians, such as Kline, defend that the Day of the Lord is comprised of three elements: inaugurated eschatology, redemptive creation, and trial by ordeal, where each of these motifs was present in the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. While these elements all hold their own merit, a survey of the Old Testament will demonstrate that the prophets speak of both near historical and far eschatological events that evince God’s wrath. The writers of the New Testament refer to the Day of the Lord in the eschatological sense in that it applies to the coming judgment that crescendos the period of Tribulation as the judgment will bring forth the coming of the new earth. The significance of the Day of the Lord is this: “The Day” refers to the forthcoming judgment of the wicked but also entails the future rewards of the Judgment Seat of Christ. After the day of placing faith in the Lord Jesus Christ for everlasting life, the second most important day in the believer’s life will be ‘that day’, for it will determine how fully the Christian will serve and glorify Jesus Christ for...
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