The Effects of Greed

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Ronald Tandazo
English 10, Ms. Myers
Williamsburg Preparatory High School
December 16, 2011
The Affects Greed Can Have Within a Community

Throughout the world the blame of the detrimental outcomes of various communities all fall on greed. The blood diamond industry in Africa is a great illustration of how greed can really damage a community because many African rebel groups have put children in risk to obtain unnecessary wealth. Clearly seen by America, greed can numb the sense of humanity and cause carelessness about the suffering around us. Greed can cause people to be materialistic and not notice the things that they really need so they can get through daily life. In The Pearl by John Steinbeck, the selfish ambition of getting more wealth within the village completely degraded the morality of the community, that even murder was an acceptable option. Many communities have fallen into the hands of corruption by reason of their greedy desires.

As the category of greed is closely examined, it is incontestable that the continent of Africa falls on that category, due to wiliness of the rebel groups to obtain unnecessary wealth. Specific countries such as Angola, the Democratic of Congo and Sierra Leone have gone through great sufferings due to the calamitous actions the industry of blood diamonds bring. As an illustration, the video “The Truth Behind Africa,” presented very unpleasant images and scenes that showed many maimed Africans. One of these horrific images was a little girl that was no older than four and she had a hopeless look on her face. The difference between this little girl and other average little girls was that she was missing her entire right forearm. The reason behind this missing forearm was because African children are tortured constantly by soldiers who are involved with the blood diamond industry. In “Conflict Diamonds: Did Someone Die for That Diamond” it says, “ Children were instructed to kill and torture civilians and take whatever valuables they found, especially diamonds, with which the rebel groups would purchase more weapons, drugs, and other materials. The children soldiers were injected with drugs against their will, mostly cocaine. Torture tactics that the rebels taught these child soldiers were cutting off the hands, arms, feet, and or legs of innocent children and citizens.” To put it differently, children were trained at a young age in order to kill, torture and accumulate materials that might bring more wealth for the rebel groups. All the consequences and lives that might be lost in the process were not considered by the rebels, as long as they got what they were looking for. To sum up, in the eyes of these rebel groups these precious diamonds have made them prosper, however, the truth is there is no prosperity in greed.

Greed within Americans has caused them to be obliviousness to the suffering world around them. In a country that is so small compared to the world, the greed within it is incomparable. The United States of America has been identified as a prosperous and free country. Nevertheless, the country has produced a total numbness. In “Conflict Diamonds: Did Someone Die for That Diamond” it says, “It is estimated that Americans buy over 65% of the world’s diamond supply. Of that 65% between 10% and 15% are blood diamonds.” To explain, the United States buys more than half of the world’s diamond supply. In addition ten percent of that supply has come from tormented laborers in Africa. Prior to this paragraph, the life of a blood diamond worker was only covered slightly, and yet the images were still vivid. With this in mind, it must be obvious that diamonds are cherished by Americans. In the Zales Commercial, there was a man and a woman. The man gave the woman a fancy box, and when the woman opened the box there was diamonds with color. As the commercial ended the woman grabbed the hand of the man in an intimate way as a show of gratitude. At last, the commercial...
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