Technology and the Developement of the Young Mind

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Jerry Walter Jr.

May 29, 2013

Technology and the Development of the Young Mind
Technology plays an integral role in our society. The Internet and Social Media are ways to keep us connected to one another. In today’s retail market, we find some of the best selling products are laptops, tablets, gaming consoles, hand held gaming devices, and music players. Most of these products are notoriously popular among adolescents and are geared toward keeping them entertained. This is because much of the marketing of these products are geared towards teens and younger children. It is being used in variety of settings for the purpose of education and entertainment. While technology has its place in the development of today’s young growing minds, too much of it can have negative effect in our homes, schools, and health.

There are many sources of technology within today’s home. From Dad’s laptop, Mom’s iPad, and the family computer, the generation of youth today has access to more variations of technology than ever before. By the time they're 2 years old, more than 90% of all American children have an online history. At 5, more than 50% regularly interact with a computer or tablet device, and by 7 or 8, many kids regularly play video games. Teenagers text an average of 3,400 times a month. The fact is, by middle school, our kids today are spending more time with media than with their parents (Clinton, Steyer). Teens tend to text their parents rather than have a verbal conversation over the phone. There also appears to be less family time due to the amount of active gaming on consoles and tablets. Console gaming in itself has attributed to an increase in violent behavior among adolescents. According to CNN.com, out of the top ten games of 2012, only one of them had nothing to do with guns or violence. Youngsters who develop a gaming habit can become slightly more aggressive — as measured by clashes with peers, for instance — at least over a period of a year or two...
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