Tda 2.9

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MU 2.4
MU 2.4:TASK 1
1.1 Outline the health and safety policies and procedures of the work setting.

If an accident occurs write down in accident book. No matter how small the injury is. With a double signature from staff and end of the day by parents Medical Records. Only prescription drugs to be recorded.

Making sure the gate is always shut on the entrance to the kitchen area so the children can’t go in and get hurt or burnt. All cleaning products are locked away in the kitchen area and children are not allowed in there. Fire exits always clear and known to staff and back exit gate key on hook if needed. Making sure children wash their hands after the toilet and before eating. Continual risk assessment of new and on-going tasks and areas of the children’s surroundings. i.e. If I see an overhanging bramble/branch in the garden, I would need to cut it off and mention it to the manger before children can play. If there were objects that could cause unnecessary accidents they would need picking up. If there was lots of mess on the floor like paper that would need to be cleaned up to avoid slips. This would be the same if there was water spilt and the manager would need to be informed. Making sure all the rooms are ventilated so the children don’t get over heated and not to cold either. Staff to child ratio on walks would be one adult to two children with the nursery that can increase to one adult to eight children. All people working even the volunteers have to be CRB checked.

The following are some of the legislations on which these policies and procedures are based Health and safety at work act 1974
The purpose of this act is to promote and encourage high standards at work place. It protects all the employers, employees, workers and the other member of the public who may be affected by the work activities.

Kite marking CE, product safety marking
When you see a product with a Kite mark this means BSI has independently tested it and has confirmed that the product conforms to the relevant British Standard, and has issued a BSI license to the company to use the Kite mark. The manufacturer pays for this service and their product is tested, and the manufacturing process is assessed, at regular intervals. The Kite mark is the symbol that gives consumers the assurance that the product they have bought really does conform to the appropriate British Standard and should therefore be safe and reliable.

The Motor vehicles (wearing of seat belts) regulations 2006
The original proposed law require all passengers aged 3 years and over to wear a seat belt in buses and coaches, if fitted.

RIDDOR - Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995 Employers, the self-employed and those in control of premises are required by law to report specified workplace incidents, such as work-related deaths, major injuries, 7-day injuries (those causing more than seven day’s inability to carry out normal duties), work related diseases, and dangerous occurrences (near miss accidents).

Employers, the self-employed and those in control of premises are required by law to report specified workplace incidents, such as work-related deaths, major injuries, 7-day injuries (those causing more than seven day’s inability to carry out normal duties), work related diseases, and dangerous occurrences (near miss accidents).

Childcare act 2006
The Childcare Act, passed into law on 11 July 2006, is pioneering legislation – the first ever exclusively concerned with Early Years and childcare. Measures in the act formalize the important strategic role local authorities play, through a set of duties. These duties require authorities to work with their NHS and Job Centre Plus partners to improve the outcomes of all children up to five years of age and reduce inequalities between them, secure sufficient childcare for working parents, provide a parental information service, Provide information,...
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